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Out of interest CC,which of Brooks' novels have you read that has led you to the conclusion that his books are boring?

I have to be brutally honest and admit that I've not actually read any of them, such is my pre-formed prejudice. So my view of Mr Brooks' literary prowess may well be unjust and based largely on ignorance, but I have, nevertheless, formed an impression of it from reading book reviews, Wiki references, and so forth. I have formed the view that he has, like so many others in the genre, mistaken overly lazy derivativeness for originality, but I accept that I may be totally wrong on this ( I did think this of Donaldson, too, and still do up to a point, but genuinely enjoyed the Covenant books). Tell you what though, I'll give it a go. Which book would you recommend I start on ?

Edited by Crispian Crunchie

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i remember Bert, was it not called Legends as well under his management

Naw,it wisnae.............................

.........................but there were a few legends drank in it!

Still see Wee Bert down at LS sometimes.

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I have to be brutally honest and admit that I've not actually read any of them, such is my pre-formed prejudice. So my view of Mr Brooks' literary prowess may well be unjust and based largely on ignorance, but I have, nevertheless, formed an impression of it from reading book reviews, Wiki references, and so forth. I have formed the view that he has, like so many others in the genre, mistaken overly lazy derivativeness for originality, but I accept that I may be totally wrong on this ( I did think this of Donaldson, too, and still do up to a point, but genuinely enjoyed the Covenant books). Tell you what though, I'll give it a go. Which book would you recommend I start on ?

No offense or anythin but this guys a bit of a bawbag :lol:

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No offense or anythin but this guys a bit of a bawbag :lol:

I just hate that wee dancing cherub thing he has......................in terms of post content there has been some "functional" contributions................. the current drift to pseudo intellectualism I agree is complete and utter bawbagism <_<

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Naw,it wisnae.............................

.........................but there were a few legends drank in it!

Still see Wee Bert down at LS sometimes.

Bert Downie was in the original Camphill and played in a band along with Dave Colquhoun. I thought Coon was the bassist, then. When we were still all at school. Can't recall who else was in the band but it wisnae called Findo Gask.

I do vaguely remember a band called Findo Gask. In the 70s...?

Tolkien books were mostly shite long-winded descriptive padding with a good basic tale and some briliant characters, though I'm sure we'd all love to kick the Hobbits' do-goodie arses - which would have made the stories about 7 or 800 pages shorter. And better.

I seldom read fantasy.

I can offer little to this thread (as you can see) but I've been away and only just found out Tuesday's scores. :o

I'm now too frail to venture into any other thread. :(

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Bert Downie was in the original Camphill and played in a band along with Dave Colquhoun. I thought Coon was the bassist, then. When we were still all at school. Can't recall who else was in the band but it wisnae called Findo Gask.

Being as they were two completely separate bands then you're probably correct that your man Coon was the bass player in the Camphill band that weren't called Findo Gask and not Bert Downie, former bass player in the band Findo Gask.

Here to help. :)

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I have to be brutally honest and admit that I've not actually read any of them, such is my pre-formed prejudice. So my view of Mr Brooks' literary prowess may well be unjust and based largely on ignorance, but I have, nevertheless, formed an impression of it from reading book reviews, Wiki references, and so forth. I have formed the view that he has, like so many others in the genre, mistaken overly lazy derivativeness for originality, but I accept that I may be totally wrong on this ( I did think this of Donaldson, too, and still do up to a point, but genuinely enjoyed the Covenant books). Tell you what though, I'll give it a go. Which book would you recommend I start on ?

It's difficult to recommend one.However, I'll give it a go.Probably, the more recent books are easier to get.

Try "Jarka Ruus"(2003) .It's the first of a trilogy which has typical elf/wraith/gnome stuff in it.

"Running with the demon" is more modern and is part of the word and the void trilogy.It is ultimately linked to the very first "Shannara" books, which doesn't become obvious until you read his most recent trilogy "genesis of Shannara".

FWIW I read books more as "bubble gum for the mind" and for straight out entertainment.I don't really like non-fiction [although I have read a few biographies/autobiographies for some of my favourite comedians] and literary "classics" don't do anything for me either.

I just have this feeling that our respective expectations from reading a book might be a tad different. :lol:

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It's difficult to recommend one.However, I'll give it a go.Probably, the more recent books are easier to get.

Try "Jarka Ruus"(2003) .It's the first of a trilogy which has typical elf/wraith/gnome stuff in it.

"Running with the demon" is more modern and is part of the word and the void trilogy.It is ultimately linked to the very first "Shannara" books, which doesn't become obvious until you read his most recent trilogy "genesis of Shannara".

FWIW I read books more as "bubble gum for the mind" and for straight out entertainment.I don't really like non-fiction [although I have read a few biographies/autobiographies for some of my favourite comedians] and literary "classics" don't do anything for me either.

I just have this feeling that our respective expectations from reading a book might be a tad different. :lol:

Youd probaly likethe Harry Potter books if you read all that kinda stuff

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Youd probaly likethe Harry Potter books if you read all that kinda stuff

sorry but harry botter books are guff.... ok they have an interesting concept but the whole popularity of 'potter stems from film and franchises.. the first movie was made after the fifth book was written. My daughter has the books and they are badly written, sorry JK but thats what i think...

as for Tolkien.. his books were an attempt to create a world rather than tell a story,, hence the endless random and unnecessary tracts of poetry/history/song which peppers his book and slows it down and puts people off.. he included the narrative merely as a means of getting from one bit to the other. If you really read it you will find that most of the actual 'story' is of a time before the actual events of the book.

A strange fact about Tolkien's fantasy world is that it is the only work of fantasy fiction that never even so much as mentions any form of religion or deity... not a single temple, god, monk, priest or such other fantasy 'staple' which is unusual given that he was devoutly christian.. on the other hand the narnia books by his friend cs lewiss are overladen with christian imagery, yet lewis was a self confessed atheist..?

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as for Tolkien.. his books were an attempt to create a world rather than tell a story,, hence the endless random and unnecessary tracts of poetry/history/song which peppers his book and slows it down and puts people off.. he included the narrative merely as a means of getting from one bit to the other. If you really read it you will find that most of the actual 'story' is of a time before the actual events of the book.

I disagree with that. The Lord of the Rings itself is actually a wonderful narrative, proceeding with an unmistakable purpose towards its conclusion. The "actual story" is wholly that, though clearly, many references are made during the course of the narrative to events that took place long before - but of necessity. It was when Tolkien went on substantially to expand the scope of the history of middle-earth well before, and subsequent to, the events recounted in LOTR, that in my opinion, he'd begun to take it too far. Or to do what the likes of Brooks have done, if you will.

the narnia books by his friend cs lewiss are overladen with christian imagery, yet lewis was a self confessed atheist..?

I'd check your facts if I were you. Lewis was never an atheist. His Ulster-rooted faith lapsed somewhat during his twenties, it is true, but was re-affirmed quite vehemently (largely due to the influence of Tolkien) in his thirties, round about the same time as he conceived the Narnia christian allegories.

Edited by Crispian Crunchie

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Set your videos for tonights Newsnight Review on BBC 2, they are discussing the merits of the Czech Metaphysical Poet Fula Bullshìt

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I'd check your facts if I were you. Lewis was never an atheist. His Ulster-rooted faith lapsed somewhat during his twenties, it is true, but was re-affirmed quite vehemently (largely due to the influence of Tolkien) in his thirties, round about the same time as he conceived the Narnia christian allegories.

Raised in a church-going family in the Church of Ireland, Lewis became an atheist at the age of 15. He remained an atheist until 31 years old.

His separation from Christianity began when he started to view his religion as a chore and as a duty; around this time he also gained an interest in the occult as his studies expanded to include such topics. Lewis quoted Lucretius as having one of the strongest arguments for atheism:

although i concede the point to you that the Narnia books were in fact written aftre his 'reconversion' to christianity.. My only previous info on Lewis was taken from a Tolkien article..

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Being as they were two completely separate bands then you're probably correct that your man Coon was the bass player in the Camphill band that weren't called Findo Gask and not Bert Downie, former bass player in the band Findo Gask.

Here to help. :)

Davie Colhoun played guitar and Mandolin in Findo Gask, fat Bert was the bassist.

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They were in a band (more successful at the time) called The Kleeverz. Drummer Stuart McKenzie, JNI Heidbanger, who went on tae The Sabres... there's a theme developing...

Ian McMillan (who usetae live on the 3rd (top floor) of a tenement where the Stowe Lounge now sits made more than a few bob with a band called Blue.

Eric got married and was settled somewhere like... Kilmacolm..?

Like Bert and Coon - ex (original) Camphill pupils.

I just wondered if you knew wot had happened to them.

I should try Friends Disunited....

Edited by chingford

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