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Paisley - My Pics Of Old Or Unusual Buildings Or Places Of Interest.


Sonny
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17 hours ago, smcc said:

My former French teacher at the JNI was was  W Steel Brownlie who landed as a tank commander on the Normandy beaches and advanced through northern France into Belgium and Holland. He was later the CO of the Ayrshire Yeomanry TA Depot in George Street. I remember him taking my class of 30+ boys on an afternoon visit to the depot and letting us crawl all over and inside the tanks. If I remember rightly he had been awarded the Military Cross.

He was indeed for an action in August 1944 when he was an Acting Captain.  He landed on D Day 6th June as a Lieutenant, was an Acting Captain by 3rd August and ended up a Major all before they crossed the German border I think.  Must have been a tough call invading Europe in a tank?  More than that he was a pretty decent bloke as teachers go.  He certainly didn't panic when one of the lads stuck a penknife in the knee of the lad sitting next to him.

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High Street

Looking back along the High Street towards the Town Centre c.1900. This view from the steps of the Museum looks across at what was No's 40-38 (now No's 63-59). The houses nearest were the property of John Wilson (father of Prof. John Wilson) and housed the Wilson Assembly Hall, and beyond that, and still standing very prominent today, is the intricately carved Stone Tenement of No.39 (now No.61)

A well kent member of this forum used to live at no. 61.

122608926_3314241418688869_5612975726988162471_o.jpg?_nc_cat=109&ccb=2&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=0llUVuh8g_EAX_uTRYK&_nc_ht=scontent-lhr8-1.xx&oh=856eccc44a3547e602fd9e79e1c3bb9e&oe=5FBBBCDC

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1 hour ago, Eric Arthur Blair said:

High Street

Looking back along the High Street towards the Town Centre c.1900. This view from the steps of the Museum looks across at what was No's 40-38 (now No's 63-59). The houses nearest were the property of John Wilson (father of Prof. John Wilson) and housed the Wilson Assembly Hall, and beyond that, and still standing very prominent today, is the intricately carved Stone Tenement of No.39 (now No.61)

A well kent member of this forum used to live at no. 61.

122608926_3314241418688869_5612975726988162471_o.jpg?_nc_cat=109&ccb=2&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=0llUVuh8g_EAX_uTRYK&_nc_ht=scontent-lhr8-1.xx&oh=856eccc44a3547e602fd9e79e1c3bb9e&oe=5FBBBCDC

A well kent member of this forum still owns a flat at no 61.

Edited by HSS
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46 minutes ago, The Original 59er said:

It always pays to look upwards at buildings, no matter where you are as often some of the finer details and quirks of the architect are 'hidden' in the upper reaches of the building.

The Russell Institute in Causeyside St is one of the finer examples!

 

 

Paisley Figure on Russell Institute Causeyside St..jpg

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-23810979

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Love Street as I never really knew it. In the 2nd photo you can just see the ground turnstiles to the right. These buildings must have been demolished to make way for the car park.

I think the aerial must have been taken like the others of that type around Paisley in the mid30's. No floodlights to be seen!

 

Love St stadium and surrounds circa 36.jpg

Love St Paisley next to hallowed turf.jpg

Edited by The Original 59er
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3 hours ago, The Original 59er said:

Paisley Mill Strike of '56.

I like the 3rd photo, you can just imagine what the guys are saying to each other as they look over at their women who are organising the strike............

 

Paisley mill strike, 1956 1.jpg

Paisley mill strike, 1956 2.jpg

Paisley mill strike, 1956.jpg

In the third photo that looks like my old West School on the right but what building is that on the left?

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(It IS the school - Gate entrance hidden by the blonde on the right)

It’s a Feegie Mill out-building,IIRC.

(that whole corner is 4-storied flats, now)

 

the woman in the suit, with her hands clasped, is looking ahead towards the Mill main gates at the top of Newton Street.

Edited by antrin
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Great job, 59er.  Every right to be proud of that bit of saved heritage!  :clapping

I've always loved its smooth stones and curvy lines.

I have a fotie of me outside it, in my kilt - which I still have.

 

If that fotie was taken today, in that kilt, I'd be arrested for indecent exposure.  Mibbe.

In the fotie, I was Page Boy at my Uncle Robert's wedding.

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Great job, 59er.  Every right to be proud of that bit of saved heritage!  :clapping
I've always loved its smooth stones and curvy lines.
I have a fotie of me outside it, in my kilt - which I still have.
 
If that fotie was taken today, in that kilt, I'd be arrested for indecent exposure.  Mibbe.
In the fotie, I was Page Boy at my Uncle Robert's wedding.


Hawd the bus, Boab wisnae that much older than you. Well he didn't look it.
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9 hours ago, The Original 59er said:

That church is something I'm quietly proud of!

After closing as a church it went the usual way of being a furniture store / odds and sods salesroom, and slowly but surely it started to really deteriorate as a building. It was a nice Grade 2 listed building, but that made no difference to the owners. 

Having been dragged up in Paisley, but now working in the big smoke (of Glasgow), I was well aware that grants were available through a government funded body and they would support development of any building if you could show that benefit would come from the investment. I had the idea of creating three floors of flats with an atrium in the middle. The big problem were the long windows on each side of the building, and how would you introduce a floor detail for the middle level of flats. The Paisley Planners weren't at all enthusiastic and basically said we couldn't touch the building, or all we could create were two levels of residential, which didn't financially work. So I asked for Historic Scotland to become involved and one of their people came to Paisley and we turned up at the building with the Paisley Planner in tow. She was fully expecting to be backed up by Historic Scotland, but they backed our idea to the hilt and said that this was one of the best solutions they had seen for a building of this type. 

So the bottom line was that we carried out the development and I can actually say, I saved the building. The great advantage that it had was no burial ground around it and internally it wasn't too ecclesiastical so not that difficult to get the right look.

I hope if any members of the forum live, or has lived here it would be good to hear what they thought of it. I haven't been in the building for a long number of years. The development was completed around 1988.

When I lived in the old Wardrop Street ( I am always hoping one day someone will produce a photo of the old tenements) I used to go up to the church at weekends and scramble for the bowl money.  One day I got 1/9d!  What a day that was!

Edited by Desperately Seeking Susans
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9 minutes ago, Desperately Seeking Susans said:

When I lived in the old Wardrop Street ( I am always hoping one day someone will produce a photo of the old tenements) I used to go up to the church at weekends and scramble for the bowl money.  One day I got 1/9d!  What a day that was!

I remember passing Stow Brae kirk when I was a kid. It was raining and i had a little umbrella. I was just passing by when the window of the car started to go down and I realised that a scramble was about to happen. A bit of quick thinking and i turned the brolly upside down and caught most of the money thrown out of the window before closing it and taking off. Could hear a few kids crying in the background as I left. Best 30 secs earnings i probably ever had.

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28 minutes ago, truesaint said:

I remember passing Stow Brae kirk when I was a kid. It was raining and i had a little umbrella. I was just passing by when the window of the car started to go down and I realised that a scramble was about to happen. A bit of quick thinking and i turned the brolly upside down and caught most of the money thrown out of the window before closing it and taking off. Could hear a few kids crying in the background as I left. Best 30 secs earnings i probably ever had.

Proud of you  :clapping

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I remember passing Stow Brae kirk when I was a kid. It was raining and i had a little umbrella. I was just passing by when the window of the car started to go down and I realised that a scramble was about to happen. A bit of quick thinking and i turned the brolly upside down and caught most of the money thrown out of the window before closing it and taking off. Could hear a few kids crying in the background as I left. Best 30 secs earnings i probably ever had.

We all loved a scramble back in the day.

I think it’s St Colombus in Foxbar which was visible from Findhorn Avenue? ( might be wrong as I was about Orchy Crescent )

We piled across the park / Brediland Rd , up the hill onto Ivanhoe Rd ? Waited patiently, dived in & headed to the shop forthwith

Do Scrambles still happen ?
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9 hours ago, truesaint said:

I remember passing Stow Brae kirk when I was a kid. It was raining and i had a little umbrella. I was just passing by when the window of the car started to go down and I realised that a scramble was about to happen. A bit of quick thinking and i turned the brolly upside down and caught most of the money thrown out of the window before closing it and taking off. Could hear a few kids crying in the background as I left. Best 30 secs earnings i probably ever had.

I hope you saved that for a rainy day?

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13 hours ago, truesaint said:

I remember passing Stow Brae kirk when I was a kid. It was raining and i had a little umbrella. I was just passing by when the window of the car started to go down and I realised that a scramble was about to happen. A bit of quick thinking and i turned the brolly upside down and caught most of the money thrown out of the window before closing it and taking off. Could hear a few kids crying in the background as I left. Best 30 secs earnings i probably ever had.

 

13 hours ago, shull said:

Proud of you  :clapping

Hey!  I might have been one of those other 'few kids crying'!:(

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Away and make a wee cup of tea for this one.


Paisley Racecourse Stand Collapse
August 8th, 1901

Over the decades the Paisley area has had probably more than its fair share of calamity with numerous tragedies i.e. mining disasters,  drownings, Cinema and Theatre  incidents, Factory explosions and Rail Accidents , however probably one of the less know tragedies is that of the Grandstand  collapse of  August 8th, 1901.

Paisley Racecourse (St James Park) was for years one of scotlands - indeed the UKs - foremost Horse Race venues. It was a place of repute, not only for the crime which took place within its environs, a reputation earned through the level of muggers and pickpockets who attended, but known for its high prize races , particularly the famous Paisley 'Silver Bells' race.  

On Thursday August 8th, 1901, the crowds thronged the course and the place was buzzing with chatter , people soaking in the atmosphere and laying bets on their particular preferred Nags, either  tipped or just fancied.  It was just after the second race that the 'Half Crown Stand', packed with approximately 1,000 spectators gave way under the weight, and before the panic stricken crowd could get clear the entire structure collapsed. 

An indescribable scene of confusion and alarm ensued and those rescuers amongst them had difficulty getting through the gathered crowd until the Police managed to break a way through to retrieve the casualties from underneath the debris of the Stand.  Stretchers were made out of any suitable material that could be found and Doctors and ambulances called for were quickly on the scene, eventually taking over 50 people to the Royal Alexandria Infirmary, Twenty of whom were detained. When word of the collapse spread rapidly around the Town large crowds flocked to the Racecourse to find out if their friends have been caught up in the accident.

When the Stand gave way there had been approximately 1,000 people on the structure but many more had taken shelter underneath from the heavy Rain that was falling, they of course suffered most severely, many of those in the Stand when feeling the structure giving way, succeeded in saving themselves from injury by leaping over the back into the Paddock.  It was fully an Hour before the last of the injured were extricated from the debris. 

Amongst those detained in Hospital by their injuries were :- 
Robert Burnett (33), a Waiter, 33 Canal Street , left Thigh broken and Right Thigh injured
Donald McTaggert (39) Boilermaker, 2 Springbank Road, Injury to Knee
James Phin (31), Clerk, 115 South Harbour Street, Ayr,  Fractured Leg
Walter Underwood, (28) Fruit Salesman, 33 Carlyle Road, Bradford,  Bruised Knee
John Cunningham Crawford, (50) Schoolmaster, Inchinnan.  Compound Fracture, Right Leg
James Johnston, (48) Miner, 5 Ashfield, Kelty, Fife. Injury to Thigh
Harry Peech, (35) Clerk, 17 Ayr Street, Sheffield. Injury to Back
Sam Neilson, (44) Corn Merchant,  22 Tyson Street, Bradford. Fracture Right Leg
Thomas Findlay Walker, (36) Ritchie Street, West Kilbride. Bruised Ankle
Robert McDowell, (58) Slater, 519 Gt Western Road, Hillhead. Bruised Shoulders and severe Shock
Hugh Johnston, (38) Labourer,  6 Albion Street, Paisley. Very severe Shock
William Walker, (57), Plasterer, 8 Rutland Crescent, Ibrox. Fractured Right Leg
William Patrick McSorley, (44) Butcher, 14 Gerfield Street, Belfast. Bruised Back and Shoulders
Thomas Colville, (16) Rivet Boy, 6 Thread Street, Paisley.  Left Eye destroyed by bursting of a Ginger Beer Bottle when Stand collapsed.
James Adair, (50) Stevedore, 150 Govan Road, Plantation.  Compound Fracture Right Leg
Thomas Hendry Bengeley, (45) Electrical Specialist, 15 Highburgh Road, Hillhead. Bruised Abdomen.
George Henry Steel, (31) Clerk, 14 Harland Road, Sheffield, Bruising and Cut Left Ear
John Cantaley, (21) Driver, 395 Gallowgate, Glasgow.  Bruised Right Abdomen and Shock
Ewan McDonald, (44) Waiter, 45 Pollock Street,  Kinning Park. Bruising to Chest
Robert Glass, (27) Machineman,  81 AitkenheadRoad, Glasgow.  Fractured Left Leg
Jane Cherry or Martin, (52) American Visitor, C/o  35 McLean Street, Plantation. Right Knee sprained and Bruising to Back
All were treated for Shock

About 38 injured people were released to go home from Hospital including:
Councillor Robert Sinclair, Clydebank
John Laing, 36 Garthlee, Airdrie
Thomas Gray, Oldbar, Paisley
Robert Hunter, Ironfounder, Ayr
Andrew Donald, 122 Eglinton Street, Glasgow
Daniel Traynor, 118 Eglinton Street, Glasgow
Robert Greig, 9 Neilson Street, Paisley (now Neilson Road)
John McGoldrich, 25 Baird Street, Airdrie
William Love, Lyberia Road, Highburgh, London
James M. Hewley, 312 West 121st Street, New York

1st two pictures are before and after.The Grandstand was situated on right hand side of 3rd photo.

EA5E0ED3-4132-4000-9944-EC4C9B3D911F.jpeg

B707A649-7D14-487A-8F5B-8DD7C2A81E46.jpeg

79CF2BEE-6D64-4D44-98C4-34868D93D140.jpeg

FC356A1D-3266-4A01-B5FE-D534152EEBAC.jpeg

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