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Paisley - My Pics Of Old Or Unusual Buildings Or Places Of Interest.


Sonny
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My Mum used to take me around Paisley and point out the buildings. The thing that sticks in my mind is the church up Oakshaw that had the things that allegedly had fallen when a workman fell off the spire in the bricks on the pavement. There were his glasses,hanky and his heart. I,m sure there were more but cant remember them all.

Who knows you may see pics of them at a later date :)

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The blackest event in the history of Brown & Polson took place at 6.40am on the 5th June, 1964, when the animal feed plant, a large building to the rear of the rear in Braids rd, was completely destroyed in a huge explosion.

Workers who had arrived for the 6.45am shift had to run for their lives. Local firemen, ambulance men and workers tore at the rubble in the search for casualties, while anxious relatives stood waiting for news. Four men were killed and four badly injured. A local policeman described the disaster, “I have seen terrible things during the war, but never anything like this.

I remember being awoke by the explosion and we used to live at the top of Braehead Road.

Was at primary school back then.

i was also living in glenburn and at primary school at the time, i lived in glenburn road and we were all wakened by the explosion, i remember being concerned for all the people who worked there and lived near me, i also remember it being caused by a build up of dust, and to this day am wary of dust building up anywhere i have worked/lived
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My Mum used to take me around Paisley and point out the buildings. The thing that sticks in my mind is the church up Oakshaw that had the things that allegedly had fallen when a workman fell off the spire in the bricks on the pavement. There were his glasses,hanky and his heart. I,m sure there were more but cant remember them all.

While a also heard that rumour as a boy, I believe they are actually apprentice pieces. not entirely sure and await enlightenment sorcerer.gif

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My mother worked in Brown & Polsons for a while. The women on the production lines used to hide packets of soup in their underwear to sneak it out (not my mum of course!). Never seen so many women wearing heavy coats during the summer months :) . Management then started searching the staff and suddenly not a big coat to be seen!

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My mother worked in Brown & Polsons for a while. The women on the production lines used to hide packets of soup in their underwear to sneak it out (not my mum of course!). Never seen so many women wearing heavy coats during the summer months smile.png . Management then started searching the staff and suddenly not a big coat to be seen!

I used to know a guy from Renfrew,who work at Tennent's and he used to wear a long Crombie coat throughout the summerwhistling.gif honest.

Also the biggest flask I've ever seen.

Edited by pod
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I used to know a guy from Renfrew,who work at Tennent's and he used to wear a long Crombie coat throughout the summerwhistling.gif honest.

Also the biggest flask I've ever seen.

My Grandad was a Docker and wore a similar coat - my dad tells a story about how he once came home with a rug wrapped around himself underneath it - I think they must have lost thousands considering the amount of stuff that wandered out (or was drank on the premises in the guise of the tea kettle).

My dad maintains to this day that he was one of the first kids in Paisley to taste a banana (after the war).

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My father is now 72 and still has nightmares about that night, the explosion not my entrance into the world. Great thread by the way.

Sometimes wonder how firemen and paramedics deal with things like that.

There is a series running on the BBC about the London Underground and last week it was looking at the how they deal with incidents where people have been hit by trains. Some drivers are being trauma trained to help other drivers immediately and if you start dealing with it there and then it is a lot better. I think that aspect will have improved in all walks of life as seeking counselling for horrible incidents will now be routine, in the 60s and 70s probably seen as only the weak who needed it etc.

The crews who clean up after were obviously used to it and the dead bodies wasn't a huge deal to them, as it never gets reported, however they found when they knew people who knew the person or it was reported in the media it makes things much harder. I'd imagine in Paisley at that time local firemen dealing with local factory workers would have fallen under that too. Seeing funerals take place and media coverage prolonged things etc.

Changed days with the birth- called up to the hospital from work, see the new kid and then back to finish the shift- no 2 weeks paternity there!

My Grandad was a Docker and wore a similar coat - my dad tells a story about how he once came home with a rug wrapped around himself underneath it - I think they must have lost thousands considering the amount of stuff that wandered out (or was drank on the premises in the guise of the tea kettle).

My dad maintains to this day that he was one of the first kids in Paisley to taste a banana (after the war).

Yes in the good old days it was amazing the amount of 'excess cargo' of whisky and tobacco that was floating about!

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I've just noticed this thread and can I jsut say for the record, its fantastic. I love walking around towns and cities and looking up, some places are stunning if you take time to look around. I often think Paisley town centre would be lovely if some buildings were given the TLC they deserve (lick of paint for the burtons store please?). My mum,dad and grandpa used to tell me loads of stories about the town and its history, its nice reading about them and putting a picture to them. Keep up the good work folks :)

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Brown and Polson always reminds me of summer as I used to pass by it on my way to the tennis courts round the corner. Not that I was any good at tennis - it was just something different to do. A couple more shots of B&P attached.

'John Polson was a famous cornflour manufacturer. Born in Paisley in 1825, he attended Paisley Grammar School and the Andersonian College in Glasgow before joining the family business.

John's father, also John, and his father's brother William, were manufacturers of muslin in Paisley. Another firm of muslin manufacturers, William Brown and Son, relocated from Glasgow to Paisley and the two firms cooperated on the process of bleaching, scouring and starching the muslin cloth. They conducted this process at Thrushcraigs, Paisley, under the name of Brown and Polson.

John Polson senior experimented to find a starch that could withstand the bleaching process, and settled on a combination of starch and sago. In 1842 he introduced his "powder starch" for use in the home. This product was such a success that it was awarded a certificate of merit at the Great Exhibition of 1851. John senior died aged 43, in 1843.

After the retiral of his Uncle William, John Polson junior continued in the firm of Brown and Polson. John Polson junior was responsible for the breakthrough in discovering how to make maize into a foodstuff by removing its fatty content and creating an edible starch. He patented this edible starch in 1854 and marketed it as "Brown and Polson's Patent Corn Flour". Cornflour has many uses in food production and is used as a thickener for gravy and soup, and as a base for custards, baby food and blancmange.

As well as being a talented businessman, John was also concerned about the welfare

of his workforce. In the 1870s he introduced a profit-sharing scheme which took the form of a yearly bonus based on the firm's profits. The workers only received this bonus if they had committed no "misdemeanours".

John Polson died in 1900. By then, Brown and Polson's were the largest manufacturer of starch products in the United Kingdom. Additional premises were required at Colinslee and at Barterholm, and later a new works was built at Falside Road, where the company remained until it closed in 1996.'

The next image is part of a series of many building that have the same connection but I'll be showing the rest one at a time so could you just leave comments on this one for now and we'll deal with the rest when they come up?

Please continue to comment on any buildings / places of interest that we have already covered. I have learned loads about Paisley myself in the last 3 weeks and am grateful for all comments.

PICTURE 23 (3rd image)

post-2737-0-96572900-1331816128_thumb.jp

post-2737-0-03939700-1331816170_thumb.jp

post-2737-0-58826900-1331816265_thumb.jp

Edited by Sonny
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'I was on nightshift with blue watch..when I was told by my station officer to get myself out to the thornhill hospital as my wife was about to give birth to my first born..when I arrived at the hospital my wife Jean had given birth to a son..I was over the moon with delight at having a son.'

Great thread by the way.

Thanks dani. My old man never saw any of his newborn until he finished his shift. They wouldnt let him away from work in those days.

I've just noticed this thread and can I jsut say for the record, its fantastic. I love walking around towns and cities and looking up, some places are stunning if you take time to look around. I often think Paisley town centre would be lovely if some buildings were given the TLC they deserve (lick of paint for the burtons store please?). My mum,dad and grandpa used to tell me loads of stories about the town and its history, its nice reading about them and putting a picture to them. Keep up the good work folks smile.png

Thanks LoveStreetLover. There are plenty more places to come.

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The next picture in the series should need no introduction as everyone knows the building. Those of a certain vintage would also have spent some time inside this building when still at school. I am so sorry to see it is up for sale but as long as its put to good use and not pulled down like so many other great Paisley buildings.

PICTURE 2

Great building (Russell Institute) but a scary place to visit as a kid. Dark and foreboding with a smell of Dettol I seem to remember.

Edited by Gordon
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Brown and Polson always reminds me of summer as I used to pass by it on my way to the tennis courts round the corner. Not that I was any good at tennis - it was just something different to do. A couple more shots of B&P attached.

'John Polson was a famous cornflour manufacturer. Born in Paisley in 1825, he attended Paisley Grammar School and the Andersonian College in Glasgow before joining the family business.

John's father, also John, and his father's brother William, were manufacturers of muslin in Paisley. Another firm of muslin manufacturers, William Brown and Son, relocated from Glasgow to Paisley and the two firms cooperated on the process of bleaching, scouring and starching the muslin cloth. They conducted this process at Thrushcraigs, Paisley, under the name of Brown and Polson.

John Polson senior experimented to find a starch that could withstand the bleaching process, and settled on a combination of starch and sago. In 1842 he introduced his "powder starch" for use in the home. This product was such a success that it was awarded a certificate of merit at the Great Exhibition of 1851. John senior died aged 43, in 1843.

After the retiral of his Uncle William, John Polson junior continued in the firm of Brown and Polson. John Polson junior was responsible for the breakthrough in discovering how to make maize into a foodstuff by removing its fatty content and creating an edible starch. He patented this edible starch in 1854 and marketed it as "Brown and Polson's Patent Corn Flour". Cornflour has many uses in food production and is used as a thickener for gravy and soup, and as a base for custards, baby food and blancmange.

As well as being a talented businessman, John was also concerned about the welfare

of his workforce. In the 1870s he introduced a profit-sharing scheme which took the form of a yearly bonus based on the firm's profits. The workers only received this bonus if they had committed no "misdemeanours".

John Polson died in 1900. By then, Brown and Polson's were the largest manufacturer of starch products in the United Kingdom. Additional premises were required at Colinslee and at Barterholm, and later a new works was built at Falside Road, where the company remained until it closed in 1996.'

The next image is part of a series of many building that have the same connection but I'll be showing the rest one at a time so could you just leave comments on this one for now and we'll deal with the rest when they come up?

Please continue to comment on any buildings / places of interest that we have already covered. I have learned loads about Paisley myself in the last 3 weeks and am grateful for all comments.

PICTURE 23 (3rd image)

Was it the ash parks next to Broadie Park? I remember playing on them and I too was shite

Edited by insaintee
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Picture 23 is The Former Anchor Recreation and Social Club ( The Rec ) we paid 5p per week deducted from our wages when I was employed by J&P Coats at the Anchor Mill ?

The building was bought by a local Scrap Dealer ( John Pitt ) who turned it into a Five aside Football venue .

i used to go to anchor rec all the time, i never worked in the mill but the wife did and her and some pals worked as waitresses/barmaids in the rec when the place was quite popular in the late 70's . it had cabarets dances etc friday/sat and sunday nights, i didn't have to pay too much for my drink in those days - not that the wife gave me freebies - it was her mates who sneaked me the odd pint
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My mother worked in Brown & Polsons for a while. The women on the production lines used to hide packets of soup in their underwear to sneak it out (not my mum of course!). Never seen so many women wearing heavy coats during the summer months smile.png . Management then started searching the staff and suddenly not a big coat to be seen!

Where's the B+P hooses pic. bangin.gif

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Where's the B+P hooses pic. bangin.gif

the funny pointy shaped ones across the road from the factory Sid - think they were built for management but not sure.

These ones....

http://www.yourlocal...isley-26436.jpg

Great shot Eddy. I was just building up Sid's excitement getting closer but not revealing anything as yet :)

And it was the tennis courts on Braids Rd behind B&P opposite Brodie Park. I was rubbish at tennis but it was a laugh during the summer holidays as we were all rubbish at the game.

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As Buddiecool has stated PICTURE 23 is indeed the Anchor Recreation Club in Blackhall. Another shot is attached.

My first experience there was a school sports day. No idea how old I was but was told we were going to the Wreck. For years I wondered about it being called the Anchor Wreck until I saw it written down and realised it was Rec and not Wreck! Stupidity of youth! Always thought it looked German or Swiss somehow :)

I played 5s at the Pitts many a time and the Rec is well known to our Chairman who played hockey there for many years.

PICTURE 24 is the first one here.

post-2737-0-17521900-1331884787_thumb.jp

post-2737-0-27101700-1331884834_thumb.jp

Edited by Sonny
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