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The West Highland Way

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Anybuddie done it?

Mrs HSS has suggested doing it this summer and was just wondering things like.....how many miles per day,accommodation,should we book through a company or work it out ourselves,etc etc?

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Anybuddie done it?

Mrs HSS has suggested doing it this summer and was just wondering things like.....how many miles per day,accommodation,should we book through a company or work it out ourselves,etc etc?

She'll be fine, leave her to it.

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Most relaxing, reliable way in which to do it AND ENJOY IT is...

DON'T CAMP,

book accommodation ahead of time and NOT carry your house on your shoulders

employ a drive ahead service to take your wee bag (changes of dry clothing etc) for you.

SOME COMPANIES WILL DO MOST OF IT FOR YOU - which is even easier and is reliable.

They do the bookings, give you an itinerary, advice and cart your baggage for you.

This package Code:WSSWHW3

with macs adventures

http://www.macsadventure.com/holiday-93/west-highland-way?gclid=CKbzgtXRir0CFSQXwwod6iUAugis is what I would choose to do if doing it with Ms bluto (who is an experienced walker).

It's 9 days (whole route is about 90+) but that means you have no giant (20 miles) days for walking - which is sheer horror if you're straggling across the Rannoch Moor, in the rain, no protection no shelter, nowhere to stop...

£510pp that includes breakfast, advice for where you get lunch/dinner is provided depending on where you stay. (Some places do evening meals). There's a pub beside each of those overnight stops, too, IIRC... :whistle:

I think you can vary the cost depending on the accommodation selected.

You can do it quicker/cheaper.... but why would you? It's a HOLIDAY, in your own land - RELAX, have a pint or two, enjoy every minute.

There are other companies. I know MACS are ok.

Edited by bluto

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Most relaxing, reliable way in which to do it AND ENJOY IT is...

DON'T CAMP,

book accommodation ahead of time and NOT carry your house on your shoulders

employ a drive ahead service to take your wee bag (changes of dry clothing etc) for you.

SOME COMPANIES WILL DO MOST OF IT FOR YOU - which is even easier and is reliable.

They do the bookings, give you an itinerary, advice and cart your baggage for you.

This package Code:WSSWHW3

with macs adventures

http://www.macsadventure.com/holiday-93/west-highland-way?gclid=CKbzgtXRir0CFSQXwwod6iUAugis is what I would choose to do if doing it with Ms bluto (who is an experienced walker).

It's 9 days (whole route is about 90+) but that means you have no giant (20 miles) days for walking - which is sheer horror if you're stragglking across the Rannoch Moor, in the rain, no protection no shelter, nowhere to stop...

£510pp that includes breakfast, advice for where you get lunch/dinner is provided depending on where you stay. (Some places do ecening meals.

I think you can vary the cost depending on the accommodation selected.

You can do it quicker/cheaper.... but why would you? It's a HOLIDAY, in your own land - RELAX, have a pint or two, enjoy every minute.

There are other companies. I know MACS are ok.

I agree with every word of this. I did it years ago and there was no enjoyment in it whatsoever as the overall feeling was one of lets get to the end. I would love to do it using accommodation along the route with good weather and a hip flask as my walking companions.

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Make sure you wear a REALLY good pair of walkig shoes/boots and socks (and enough socks to last the week)or your feet will be in tatters before Glencoe. Also take layers of light clothing, as its easier to peel off/put on layers as the weather changes. And, talking of weather, you need a good waterproof jacket. It is Scotland after all.

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I agree with all of the above. We did it in 4.5 days (20+ miles for 4 days) and it was a bit of a slog during the day, as we felt we couldn't sit down for more than 5 mins as we had to get to our booked hotel by night-fall. It was still enjoyable, but I would say 6 or 7 days would be ideal.

Getting a company to carry your bags would be a must, also. We passed so many folk carrying tents and fully laden backpacks looking miserable. A wee day pack with some waterproofs, water and sandwiches is all you need to cart around with you.

Make sure you break in your walking boots before you go - and also carry some blister plasters with you. I had some compeed blister patches with me and they were great. It's personal preference, but I like to wear two pairs of socks when walking - normally a thick hiking sock and a thin sports sock, and that seems to keep the blisters mostly at bay.

Hope you enjoy it!

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Me and the missus doing it this August. We are planning doing it over 8 days, mileage per day varies between 6 - a wee morning walk to Crianlarich - and 16, the long final hike to Fort William.

Can't wait. We are so lucky to live in such a beautiful country, makes you wonder why so many people go abroad!

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Me and the missus doing it this August. We are planning doing it over 8 days, mileage per day varies between 6 - a wee morning walk to Crianlarich - and 16, the long final hike to Fort William.

Can't wait. We are so lucky to live in such a beautiful country, makes you wonder why so many people go abroad!

Agree that we are blessed to have such stunning countryside but the answer to your last bit is simply the weather.

I doubt I'd go abroad as much, although the extortionate prices and poor service at home are another reason for going abroad.

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I agree with all of the above. We did it in 4.5 days (20+ miles for 4 days) and it was a bit of a slog during the day, as we felt we couldn't sit down for more than 5 mins as we had to get to our booked hotel by night-fall. It was still enjoyable, but I would say 6 or 7 days would be ideal.

Getting a company to carry your bags would be a must, also. We passed so many folk carrying tents and fully laden backpacks looking miserable. A wee day pack with some waterproofs, water and sandwiches is all you need to cart around with you.

Make sure you break in your walking boots before you go - and also carry some blister plasters with you. I had some compeed blister patches with me and they were great. It's personal preference, but I like to wear two pairs of socks when walking - normally a thick hiking sock and a thin sports sock, and that seems to keep the blisters mostly at bay.

Hope you enjoy it!

Aye!!!

COMPEED!!!

De rigeur...

smile.png

ETA: Another thing I might suggest is going in early May - to avoid the midgies.

And mibbe buy me a pint in gratitude for my inestimable advice, as you pass through Tyndrum... or just wave to me up the hills....

Edited by bluto

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At the very least, I'd recommend arranging for your bags to be transported between stops as IanW has sugested, as carrying all the kit required is horrendous unless you're a Marine.

Also, the advice to get a hold of very good boots is sound. I'd go for something light but supportive. There are plenty of quality options out there, though I find Merrell are among the most comfortable I've worn (and not over-priced for what you get). They size on the small side, though.

Watch out for midges. This goes without saying, but unless you're walking at a fair old pace (and as I know how auld you are, I cannae see it!), they can be bothersome buggers on the Loch Lomond stretches in particular, even when on the move. Take a good supply of repellent.

On the two pairs of socks argument, I've always been told that this increases foot slippage in your boots, and hence blister potential, so you're better with one thicker pair. In my experience, this is the best approach, and I very seldom suffer from blisters nowadays (though that might be the old man leather feet thing).

As Lex has mentioned, we're spoiled to be living in a stunning country. Enjoy it, however you choose to approach the walk!

ETA: going back to socks....I'd suggest that investing in good quality socks is just as important as good boots.

Edited by Drew

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Aye!!!

COMPEED!!!

De rigeur...

smile.png

ETA: Another thing I might suggest is going in early May - to avoid the midgies.

And mibbe buy me a pint in gratitude for my inestimable advice, as you pass through Tyndrum... or just wave to me up the hills....

Beat me to it with the midges!

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I've no doubt that proper hiking footwear is needed for a trip like this.

The issue I would have would be picking the right type and then spending time breaking them in before the long walk.

After a 30 year gap I finally got round to buying a new pair of Docs and I forgot just how comfortable they are and they are rarely off my feet these days.

For those that have done the West Highland Way would it be stupid to attempt it in my trusted Docs?

I sometimes wonder why I spent the last 30years without a pair of Docs.

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I've no doubt that proper hiking footwear is needed for a trip like this.

The issue I would have would be picking the right type and then spending time breaking them in before the long walk.

After a 30 year gap I finally got round to buying a new pair of Docs and I forgot just how comfortable they are and they are rarely off my feet these days.

For those that have done the West Highland Way would it be stupid to attempt it in my trusted Docs?

I sometimes wonder why I spent the last 30years without a pair of Docs.

I wouldn't try it in DMs unless you fancy a bit of aquaplaning!

I've got a pair of DM shoes that I've had for the past 5 years or so. They weigh a bloody tonne, but are comfy for all that. I wouldn't use them to walk a hill, though.

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It's the soles of boots that can be problematic on the Scottish hills. Worn soles, or boots with little or no grip is just asking for yer feet tae skite and collapse ye on yer erse.

Good soles simply make for easier, safer walking.

On rough rocky areas like the Cuillins (Rum and Skye), Glen Coe, Arkle, Foinavon... I wear leather boots with a bit of ankle protection.

For Trails or the Cairngorms, I use lighter weight, gore-texed efforts. My favourites for the last three years have been from Inov8, a Durham company. Quite pricey, though.

http://www.inov-8.com/New/Global/Index.asp?L=26

Ultra lightweight, Roclite 282 for trail walking (and also drinking in) and others for running. Having such minimal weight in COMFY boots makes a massive physical and pschological benefit/boost.

Above comments for Summer only.

NO BOOTS are completely waterproof in Scotland.

Edited by bluto

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It's the soles of boots that can be problematic on the Scottish hills. Worn soles, or boots with little or no grip is just asking for yer feet tae skite and collapse ye on yer erse.

Good soles simply make for easier, safer walking.

On rough rocky areas like the Cuillins (Rum and Skye), Glen Coe, Arkle, Foinavon... I wear leather boots with a bit of ankle protection.

For Trails or the Cairngorms, I use lighter weight, gore-texed efforts. My favourites for the last three years have been from Inov8, a Durham company. Quite pricey, though.

http://www.inov-8.com/New/Global/Index.asp?L=26

Ultra lightweight, Roclite 282 for trail walking (and also drinking in) and others for running. Having such minimal weight in COMFY boots makes a massive physical and pschological benefit/boost.

Above comments for Summer only.

NO BOOTS are completely waterproof in Scotland.

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^^^^^^ Too much time on his hands today. whistling.gif

Car back , going to KFC in Darnley with Abby now. thumbup2.gif

Edited by shull

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It's the soles of boots that can be problematic on the Scottish hills. Worn soles, or boots with little or no grip is just asking for yer feet tae skite and collapse ye on yer erse.

Good soles simply make for easier, safer walking.

On rough rocky areas like the Cuillins (Rum and Skye), Glen Coe, Arkle, Foinavon... I wear leather boots with a bit of ankle protection.

For Trails or the Cairngorms, I use lighter weight, gore-texed efforts. My favourites for the last three years have been from Inov8, a Durham company. Quite pricey, though.

http://www.inov-8.com/New/Global/Index.asp?L=26

Ultra lightweight, Roclite 282 for trail walking (and also drinking in) and others for running. Having such minimal weight in COMFY boots makes a massive physical and pschological benefit/boost.

Above comments for Summer only.

NO BOOTS are completely waterproof in Scotland.

You're in your element with this thread snore.gif

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I've walked round Cumbrae twice. Got off the ferry fae' Largs, turned right - wee rucksack with some Irn Bru and water in it. Stopped twice for Irn Bru before arriving at the Fintry Bay tearooms for cake and coffee. Carried on to Millport for a fish and chips lunch and a game of putting. Sat on the front in 75 degrees sunshine looking at Arran, the palm trees, and thinking 'Scotland is fcuking brilliant'. Carried on to the watersports centre for a seat and a cold Coke out of their drinks machine. Suitably refreshed, finished the journey by walking the rest of the way back to the ferry slip, sailed across to Largs again, on the top deck in 75 degrees and not for the first time that day thought to myself 'Scotland is fcuking brilliant'.

Socks worn were white Slazenger sports socks, from a JJB Sports five-pack, and footwear was Adidas trainers from the outlet store in Livingston.

I can report no footwear or hosiery related incidents. Much, much more enjoyable than cycling around the island I thought. 10 miles approx'.

It's just Cumbrae, it's just Millport, but on that day, in that weather, there was no better place on earth to be.

The one thing we can surely all agree on is that Scotland is indeed 'fcuking brilliant'.

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The one thing we can surely all agree on is that Scotland is indeed 'fcuking brilliant'.

I'm sure a certain individual from South Lanarkshire will be along shortly to disagree.

But yes - the rest of us mere mortals would agree.

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