Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
St.Ricky

Why does football bring out the worst behaviour in some people?

Recommended Posts

At Easter Road on Saturday fans of both teams payed respect by joining in 1 minutes applause for young Myrren who had sadly passed away. Saints fans also applauded a group of young football players who made a circuit of the stadium. Made me proud to be a fan. 

Meanwhile (and this is not a rant against the OF). Large political banners at Parkhead and Sectarian singing and thuggish behaviour by one set of fans down at Kilmarnock. 

Edited by St.Ricky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, St.Ricky said:

At Easter Road on Saturday fans of both teams payed respect by joining in 1 minutes applause for young Myren who had sadly passed away. Saints fans also applauded a group of young football players who made a circuit of the stadium. Made me proud to be a fan. 

Meanwhile (and this is not a rant against the OF). Large political banners at Parkhead and Sectarian singing and thuggish behaviour by one set of fans down at Kilmarnock. 

Maybe spelling the little girls name correctly would have been more respectful? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, St.Ricky said:

Meanwhile (and this is not a rant against the OF). Large political banners at Parkhead and Sectarian singing and thuggish behaviour by one set of fans down at Kilmarnock. 

No change there. Animals will be animals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, St.Ricky said:

At Easter Road on Saturday fans of both teams payed respect by joining in 1 minutes applause for young Myren who had sadly passed away. Saints fans also applauded a group of young football players who made a circuit of the stadium. Made me proud to be a fan. 

Meanwhile (and this is not a rant against the OF). Large political banners at Parkhead and Sectarian singing and thuggish behaviour by one set of fans down at Kilmarnock. 

You love Sevco, Celtic and their fans ye condoning bigot. 

Why a new thread when there are plenty similar available. 

What do your sectarian condoning friends do about their fellow bigot fans ? 

Edited by shull

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until the authorities come down hard on bigotry nothing will change. It needs the Scottish Parliament, Police , Faith leaders to come together. Law changes that ban any type of bigotry. Should also be brought into education from an early age right through to leaving school regarding religious tolerance. Any type of religious marches band. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, St.Ricky said:

Pod. They certainly acted like that in Kilmarnock. Something, I hope, we never emulate. 

Animals don't act like they morons, animals do what they do for survival be interesting  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't bring out the worst in people.

Sport removes inhibition and removing inhibition brings out a person's true underlying character.

Everything else is a facade.

It's not that these people are normal people who go a bit mental at football. It's that these people are animals who keep a lid on it at work during the week but revert to type during a match.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, oaksoft said:

It doesn't bring out the worst in people.

Sport removes inhibition and removing inhibition brings out a person's true underlying character.

Everything else is a facade.

It's not that these people are normal people who go a bit mental at football. It's that these people are animals who keep a lid on it at work during the week but revert to type during a match.

Certainly an argument there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, oaksoft said:

It doesn't bring out the worst in people.

Sport removes inhibition and removing inhibition brings out a person's true underlying character.

Everything else is a facade.

It's not that these people are normal people who go a bit mental at football. It's that these people are animals who keep a lid on it at work during the week but revert to type during a match.

So define "animals" please- any species in particular ?

Would make more sense for all animals to retort - "stop acting like a human"    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DougJamie said:

So define "animals" please- any species in particular ?

Would make more sense for all animals to retort - "stop acting like a human"    

I hesitate to define any group of people as animals. Sub-human perhaps in the way these people behaved. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, St.Ricky said:

I hesitate to define any group of people as animals. Sub-human perhaps in the way these people behaved. 

Funny how when Man's brain got bigger that he started acting stupid ( we must have some geniuses on here:whistle

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Johnny Rep said:
10 hours ago, St.Ricky said:

Pod. They certainly acted like that in Kilmarnock. Something, I hope, we never emulate. 

Animals don't act like they morons, animals do what they do for survival be interesting  

Really!  in that case how does a fox in a chicken run killing all the chickens help it survive, when they do not always even eat them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, oaksoft said:

It doesn't bring out the worst in people.

Sport removes inhibition and removing inhibition brings out a person's true underlying character.

Everything else is a facade.

It's not that these people are normal people who go a bit mental at football. It's that these people are animals who keep a lid on it at work during the week but revert to type during a match.

Bit of psychoanalysis there Oaky?  😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, St.Ricky said:

Riveting and unmissable, I would say.

Topical though with anti social behaviour on show at Kilmarnock.

This might help...

 

Violent and antisocial behaviour at football events

x1532017523055.png.pagespeed.ic.WZu7as2I

To help Qatar prepare to host sporting events in 2019 and 2022, researchers examined the nature of, and the factors associated with, antisocial and violent behaviour at football matches and how effective existing approaches are in preventing and responding to these behaviours.

The research found that, while multiple contributing factors to disorder have been identified, no single factor is found to be responsible in all cases. Even so, they were able to identify interventions with evidence of effectiveness. Among them, the use of security cameras, mandatory transport arrangements for visiting fans and early kick-off times appear to be effective; policing approaches aimed at establishing dialogue and positive lines of communication with fans look promising; and volunteers can play an important role in maintaining public safety and supporting positive spectator behaviours.

Background

Antisocial behaviour at football matches is a well-recognised issue. Police, football associations and governments have used numerous interventions and strategies intended to prevent and respond to such behaviour. Ahead of two international sporting events in Qatar — the World Athletics Championship in 2019 and the 2022 FIFA World Cup — Qatar University commissioned RAND Europe to undertake a study into violence and disorder at international sporting events.

Goals

The aim of the study was to understand the nature of, and factors associated with antisocial and violent behaviours at football matches and to examine how effective existing approaches are in preventing and responding to these behaviours. To help Qatar plan for the sporting events the researchers looked at what could be learned from available research and what recommendations could be made to prevent and respond to potential harmful behaviour.

Methodology

The research team carried out transparent and systematic reviews of academic and grey literature alongside quasi-systematic document reviews of policy and media sources. Thirty-five interviews were conducted with Qatari and international experts and stakeholders. Case studies explored specific topics in greater depth and identified possible lessons for Qatar.

Findings

The influence of alcohol, sporting rivalries, spatial factors, socio-political factors, psychological factors, situational factors and reaction to play are all factors that drive violent and antisocial behaviour. However, these factors typically interact, and no single factor is found to be responsible in all cases.

The quality of evidence varies significantly and there is not enough evidence about behaviour trends over time or in different contexts. There is a lack of research particularly in relation to the Middle East and North Africa region which makes it difficult to establish an evidence-based strategy for the 2022 World Cup.

There are significant cultural differences in attitudes to alcohol across and within countries, but fans from many parts of the world expect to be able to drink alcohol as part of the experience of watching international football matches. Some international lessons relating to alcohol may not be transferrable to the Qatari context. For instance, existing alcohol restrictions in Qatar and the absence of unsanctioned sources of alcohol may make alcohol control strategies more effective.

The use of security cameras, mandatory transport arrangements for visiting fans and early kick-off times appear to be effective in reducing violence and antisocial behaviour.

Policing approaches aimed at establishing dialogue and positive lines of communication with fans look promising. Some studies found that policing methods that try to cultivate mutually respectful relations between fans and police were effective. However evidence presented in the case study on violence at Euro 2016 suggests that police forces also need a range of tactics, require sufficient resources, and need to be prepared to scale up the response should the situation need it.

Crowd behaviour modelling (CBM) can capture the complex cultural, individual and environmental differences in how people move in a space to predict how mixed crowds behave. CBM is most effective when it is collaborative and iterative between the experts carrying out the modelling, the client and relevant parties such as stadium security officers.

A case study on the role of volunteers at major sporting events found that volunteers have an important role to play in maintaining public safety and supporting positive spectator behaviours during major sporting events.

Some promising practices can be drawn from the 2018 World Cup in Russia. Experts views were that international police cooperation and measured policing tactics helped to ensure a largely trouble-free event, while effective, measured and consistent security arrangements were seen by many fans to have contributed to a positive experience.

Key lessons

While there is no single factor that causes disorder in football crowds, evidence suggests that some interventions can be effective in preventing and responding to violent and antisocial behaviour. This means that host nations should be able to take practical steps to minimise the chances of disorder during a tournament. Research strongly suggests that harmful behaviour increases when disproportionate or inconsistent policing and security tactics, queues and delays for stadium entry hinders fans’ movement.

There is a menu of promising practices that event organisers can consider. In terms of policing tactics, lessons show that low-intensity policing is associated with more peaceful crowds. Such approaches are based on building relationships with fans and intelligence sharing and cooperation between law enforcement agencies in different countries, both in advance of and during an event.

There are opportunities for further research before, during and after Qatar 2022. While evidence gaps create challenges for those planning the next World Cup, the event provides a unique chance to plan a strategic portfolio of data collection, analysis and empirical social research.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, DougJamie said:

Funny how when Man's brain got bigger that he started acting stupid ( we must have some geniuses on here:whistle

 

Intelligence led policing with close cooperation between club and SLO should surely help in the long run. In the short term, as we saw ourselves, this can cause ructions within the fan base. Worth it though to establish a better atmosphere. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...