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faraway saint
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10 hours ago, Hiram Abiff said:

I hold my hands up.

I have been completely wrong.

This has turned out to far far worse than I expected.

And the numbers of Covid 19 deaths I see reported on the TV are vastly underestimated.

Its a catastrophe beyond what I could have imagined and I will now shut up.

As must of you already knew, I’m an arse.

 

You had every right to voice your opinion. It wouldn't be much of a forum if we all agreed with one another. However, as someone else remarked, it's very decent of you to admit you were wrong. Fair play.

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Amongst all the gloom and doom there's been plenty, too many to mention, of people doing amazing things every day.

This man, 99 years old, set out to raise £1,000 for the NHS by walking 100 laps of his garden.

He's now on £4.2 MILLION.

Well done sir, well done indeed.  :clapping

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-52278746

Edited by faraway saint
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40 minutes ago, faraway saint said:

Amongst all the gloom and doom there's been plenty, too many to mention, of people doing amazing things every day.

This man, 99 years old, set out to raise £1,000 for the NHS by walking 100 laps of his garden.

He's now on £4.2 MILLION.

Well done sir, well done indeed.  :clapping

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-52278746

Stop being racist! 

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Just 19 patients treated over Easter weekend at 4,000-bed NHS Nightingale hospital in London

Few patients were treated at the new overflow facility as intensive care capacity at existing London hospitals never went above 80 per cent

We appear to have gone way beyond “flattening the curve” which was the whole point of the lockdown.

I admit that I now know this virus is more lethal the flu for certain vulnerable groups.

The lockdown can’t go on for ever and a vaccine won’t be here anytime soon. For the vast majority, this is a mild d or non symptomatic illness.

The vulnerable are being isolated, I see no reason for this lockdown to continue.

It’ll kill more people than it saves.

 

Edited by Hiram Abiff
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33 minutes ago, Hiram Abiff said:

For the idiot who harps on about care home deaths being covered up, the ONS weekly reports can’t hide all cause mortality.

About the care-home deaths “cover-up”...

I really enjoyed Chris Brookmyre’s Tweet in support of the Government, yesterday.  :)

 

 

 

Edited by antrin
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1 hour ago, Hiram Abiff said:

Just 19 patients treated over Easter weekend at 4,000-bed NHS Nightingale hospital in London

Few patients were treated at the new overflow facility as intensive care capacity at existing London hospitals never went above 80 per cent

We appear to have gone way beyond “flattening the curve” which was the whole point of the lockdown.

I admit that I now know this virus is more lethal the flu for certain vulnerable groups.

The lockdown can’t go on for ever and a vaccine won’t be here anytime soon. For the vast majority, this is a mild d or non symptomatic illness.

The vulnerable are being isolated, I see no reason for this lockdown to continue.

It’ll kill more people than it saves.

 

I think the issue on an exit strategy is it's genuinely not known how we can do this anytime soon without risking (and ending) many lives. There is no doubt UK has poorly managed this in comparison to other nations but we are where we are now and that needs to reflect next stages. We can get the torches out when we go BAU. If some hospital ICUs are at 80% capacity now with lockdown approaching close to a month, would ending lockdown not surely push them up at the very least 20% and likely far more?

I know you admitted you were wrong on the deadliness of this but my point to you was on short-sightedness. The same applies for this. More people out and about at this stage would very likely cause the virus to bounce back. We are still potentially a wee bit away from peak by some estimates or not long had it by others. Now is not the time for more people to be in widespread contact with each other. 

Exit strategy needed but I do empathise with the people involved on why there isn't one. 

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With a year plus till a vaccine is ready it'll be a long time before we return to normality, that's why it was so depressing today to hear Trump say he was cutting funding to the WHO - really this pandemic is too serious for Trump's brand of sabre-rattling politics, who knows what he'll be prepared to do/say in an election year?

*********************

On the lockdown exit strategy perhaps I'm reading too much between the lines but I reckon the government is priming us for an early easing of restrictions for economic reasons. Maybe more categories of businesses could be opened but the risk of opening bars, restaurants, theatres, professional sporting events till we have a vaccine seems too risky to me. I live quite close to a bowling club perhaps that could be re-opened with social distancing maintained and people only touching their own balls :youngman but the 5-a-side place up the road - no chance.

*********************

I'm 20 years out of science and usually have little interest in what's going in that field but even I'm trying to reopen long dormant neural pathways and what I've seen over the last month or so leaves little room for optimism.

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33 minutes ago, Bud the Baker said:

With a year plus till a vaccine is ready it'll be a long time before we return to normality, that's why it was so depressing today to hear Trump say he was cutting funding to the WHO - really this pandemic is too serious for Trump's brand of sabre-rattling politics, who knows what he'll be prepared to do/say in an election year?

*********************

On the lockdown exit strategy perhaps I'm reading too much between the lines but I reckon the government is priming us for an early easing of restrictions for economic reasons. Maybe more categories of businesses could be opened but the risk of opening bars, restaurants, theatres, professional sporting events till we have a vaccine seems too risky to me. I live quite close to a bowling club perhaps that could be re-opened with social distancing maintained and people only touching their own balls :youngman but the 5-a-side place up the road - no chance.

*********************

I'm 20 years out of science and usually have little interest in what's going in that field but even I'm trying to reopen long dormant neural pathways and what I've seen over the last month or so leaves little room for optimism.

Ultimately economic reasons will be the driving force behind any lockdown relaxation.

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I think the issue on an exit strategy is it's genuinely not known how we can do this anytime soon without risking (and ending) many lives. There is no doubt UK has poorly managed this in comparison to other nations but we are where we are now and that needs to reflect next stages. We can get the torches out when we go BAU. If some hospital ICUs are at 80% capacity now with lockdown approaching close to a month, would ending lockdown not surely push them up at the very least 20% and likely far more?
I know you admitted you were wrong on the deadliness of this but my point to you was on short-sightedness. The same applies for this. More people out and about at this stage would very likely cause the virus to bounce back. We are still potentially a wee bit away from peak by some estimates or not long had it by others. Now is not the time for more people to be in widespread contact with each other. 
Exit strategy needed but I do empathise with the people involved on why there isn't one. 
Well said!
I agree!
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The word "quarantine" originates from quarantena, the Venetian language form, meaning "forty days" This is due to the 40-day isolation of ships and people practiced as a measure of disease prevention related to the plague.
40 days , no more, no less. 
12 weeks was strongly hinted at right back in the early days.

More than double your target.

Right or wrong?

No idea... But I'm prepared to play it safe for the common good if need be.
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2 hours ago, Bud the Baker said:

With a year plus till a vaccine is ready it'll be a long time before we return to normality, that's why it was so depressing today to hear Trump say he was cutting funding to the WHO - really this pandemic is too serious for Trump's brand of sabre-rattling politics, who knows what he'll be prepared to do/say in an election year?

*********************

IIRC.... USA has already defaulted on the previous two months of its payment to WHO.

US was already paying it late/differently from what the Obama regime had been doing. 

China had been a regular and reliable performer and the WHO knew it could rely on that source of funding, so possibly the WHO was being more appreciative of the Chinese than it was of the US's failing/diminishing consistency of support??   ... which is perhaps why Trump has been getting ever more petty and hissy-fittish?

I'm an arsehole, of course, simply for trying to rationalise any action of Trump's...   :rolleyes:

 

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Amongst all the gloom and doom there's been plenty, too many to mention, of people doing amazing things every day.
This man, 99 years old, set out to raise £1,000 for the NHS by walking 100 laps of his garden.
He's now on £4.2 MILLION.
Well done sir, well done indeed.  :clapping
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-52278746


Over £5 Million.

BBC News - Coronavirus: Army veteran Tom Moore finds out he's raised £5m for NHS
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52296313
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6 hours ago, Bud the Baker said:

With a year plus till a vaccine is ready it'll be a long time before we return to normality, that's why it was so depressing today to hear Trump say he was cutting funding to the WHO 

The second biggest funded of the WHO is Bill Gates

And of course, Bill Gates will produce the vaccine

Its therefore in the WHO’s interests to create as much hysteria as possible

All vested interests 

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