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Interesting view from an American doctor......................he only left out the term "fcukwits". 

Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.
Sun, 1 August 2021, 2:00 pm
 
 
A
 
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“We can’t let COVID win.”

This was my colleague’s mantra when the pandemic started last year. And for the almost 18 months since, health care workers have rallied to the battlefields, even at times when we had no weapons to brandish.

We took care of the infected and the critically ill when no one else would. We reused N95 masks, carefully placing them in labeled brown paper bags in between shifts. We witnessed lonely deaths and held up iPads for families to say their heartbreaking goodbyes. We created elaborate backup schedules and neglected our personal lives. We stepped up during surges and when our colleagues fell ill. Camaraderie in the ICU had never been stronger because we recognized that this was a team effort and all of humanity was battling against a common enemy.

But as health care workers, we also were painfully aware of our own vulnerabilities. We can run out of ICU resources for our patients. We can run out of personal protective equipment for ourselves. We can be exposed on the job and get sick. And we can die — many of us did, more than 3,600 from COVID-19 in the first year.

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Many of us quarantined away from our families to protect the ones we love. We counted the risk factors of our children, our elderly parents, our spouses, and came up with our own formulas to decide whether to come home at the end of the shift or hole up in a hotel room. One of our ICU directors wrote and rewrote our COVID-19 clinical guidelines to keep up with the evolving literature and somehow she carved out the time to write her own will.

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)
 
The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)

I worked daily to adapt our end-of-life program to the changing needs and restrictions of the pandemic and signed up for a vaccine clinical trial as soon as one became available. I also updated my own advance directive and printed it out for my husband, just in case.

Then, effective vaccines became widely available in the U.S. — I briefly saw light at the end of the tunnel. The number of patients with COVID-19 in ICUs across the country plummeted. It looked like our sacrifices and commitment as health care workers had paid off. We believed herd immunity could become a reality and we could return to some sense of normalcy.

But the relief was short-lived, the hope was fleeting, and we are amid another surge. A surge that is fueled by a highly transmissible variant and those unvaccinated. My experiences in the ICU these past weeks have left me surprised, disheartened, but most of all, angry.

I am angry that the tragic scenes of prior surges are being played out yet again, but now with ICUs primarily filled with patients who have chosen not to be vaccinated. I am angry that it takes me over an hour to explain to an anti-vaxxer full of misinformation that intubation isn’t what “kills patients” and that their wish for chest compressions without intubation in the event of a respiratory arrest makes no sense. I am angry at those who refuse to wear “muzzles” when grocery shopping for half an hour a week, as I have been so-called “muzzled” for much of the past 18 months.

I cannot understand the simultaneous decision to not get vaccinated and the demand to end the restrictions imposed by a pandemic. I cannot help but recoil as if I’ve been slapped in the face when my ICU patient tells me they didn’t get vaccinated because they “just didn’t get around to it.” Although such individuals do not consider themselves anti-vaxxers, their inaction itself is a decision — a decision to not protect themselves or their families, to fill a precious ICU bed, to let new variants flourish, and to endanger the health care workers and immunosuppressed people around them. Their inaction is a decision to let this pandemic continue to rage.

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1 hour ago, faraway saint said:

Interesting view from an American doctor......................he only left out the term "fcukwits". 

Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.
Sun, 1 August 2021, 2:00 pm
 
 
A
 
A

“We can’t let COVID win.”

This was my colleague’s mantra when the pandemic started last year. And for the almost 18 months since, health care workers have rallied to the battlefields, even at times when we had no weapons to brandish.

We took care of the infected and the critically ill when no one else would. We reused N95 masks, carefully placing them in labeled brown paper bags in between shifts. We witnessed lonely deaths and held up iPads for families to say their heartbreaking goodbyes. We created elaborate backup schedules and neglected our personal lives. We stepped up during surges and when our colleagues fell ill. Camaraderie in the ICU had never been stronger because we recognized that this was a team effort and all of humanity was battling against a common enemy.

But as health care workers, we also were painfully aware of our own vulnerabilities. We can run out of ICU resources for our patients. We can run out of personal protective equipment for ourselves. We can be exposed on the job and get sick. And we can die — many of us did, more than 3,600 from COVID-19 in the first year.

- ADVERTISEMENT -

Many of us quarantined away from our families to protect the ones we love. We counted the risk factors of our children, our elderly parents, our spouses, and came up with our own formulas to decide whether to come home at the end of the shift or hole up in a hotel room. One of our ICU directors wrote and rewrote our COVID-19 clinical guidelines to keep up with the evolving literature and somehow she carved out the time to write her own will.

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)
 

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)

I worked daily to adapt our end-of-life program to the changing needs and restrictions of the pandemic and signed up for a vaccine clinical trial as soon as one became available. I also updated my own advance directive and printed it out for my husband, just in case.

Then, effective vaccines became widely available in the U.S. — I briefly saw light at the end of the tunnel. The number of patients with COVID-19 in ICUs across the country plummeted. It looked like our sacrifices and commitment as health care workers had paid off. We believed herd immunity could become a reality and we could return to some sense of normalcy.

But the relief was short-lived, the hope was fleeting, and we are amid another surge. A surge that is fueled by a highly transmissible variant and those unvaccinated. My experiences in the ICU these past weeks have left me surprised, disheartened, but most of all, angry.

I am angry that the tragic scenes of prior surges are being played out yet again, but now with ICUs primarily filled with patients who have chosen not to be vaccinated. I am angry that it takes me over an hour to explain to an anti-vaxxer full of misinformation that intubation isn’t what “kills patients” and that their wish for chest compressions without intubation in the event of a respiratory arrest makes no sense. I am angry at those who refuse to wear “muzzles” when grocery shopping for half an hour a week, as I have been so-called “muzzled” for much of the past 18 months.

I cannot understand the simultaneous decision to not get vaccinated and the demand to end the restrictions imposed by a pandemic. I cannot help but recoil as if I’ve been slapped in the face when my ICU patient tells me they didn’t get vaccinated because they “just didn’t get around to it.” Although such individuals do not consider themselves anti-vaxxers, their inaction itself is a decision — a decision to not protect themselves or their families, to fill a precious ICU bed, to let new variants flourish, and to endanger the health care workers and immunosuppressed people around them. Their inaction is a decision to let this pandemic continue to rage.

Aye, that's pretty much what I said. 🤣

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8 hours ago, Slarti said:

Aye, that's pretty much what I said. 🤣

That's pretty much what people with half or more of a functioning brain have been saying for months, now. Which begs the obvious question...that's your cue again, faraway. 

🙂

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Oh deary deary me.

Masks and Nightclubs

So as long as you have a pint in your hand you will not be needing to wear a face mask in either pubs or nightclubs but it's too dangerous to go without one when picking up a pint of milk at Tesco. All this is according to a government spokesman as seen in that tweet. :lol:

I feel sorry for anyone (including some professional scientists) who genuinely believed masking was all about the science. You are going to feel a bit f**king daft after today, if you have any sort of self awareness or humility whatsoever.

Is anyone really going to mask up for milk knowing people can freely abandon those masks in virtually every other setting?

You have to admit. It's pretty hilarious how much of a knot Sturgeon has tied herself up in because of her undying obsession with appearing to care more than Boris.

A bit of advice Nicola. Go to the press tomorrow morning and announce that masking is highly recommended but no longer legally required. And never, EVER darken our doorsteps again with this nonsense ya big dafty. :lol:

Edited by oaksoft
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/14/2021 at 6:58 PM, faraway saint said:

It seems you are the angel of death as, overall, suicides are not showing any increases during the pandemic.

As of June 2021, official statistics on suicide rates during the pandemic have not been released. This is because it takes a long time to register, analyse and report on suicide data at a national level, and this has been further delayed due to the pandemic.

Fortunately, provisional suicide rates for 2020 in England has found no evidence that national suicide rates increased. And evidence from the National Confidential Inquiry (NCISH) and the University of Manchester suggests suicide rates during the first national lockdown in England have not been impacted in the way that many of us were concerned about. Real-time data from other nations in the UK and Ireland is not available as surveillance systems are not currently widespread, though some are under development.

Scottish trends - ScotPHO

Suicide: Scottish trends

In 2020, 805 suicides were registered in Scotland (575 males and 230 females), compared to 833 (620 males and 213 females) in 2019. These numbers comprise deaths coded to 'intentional self-harm' and to 'events of undetermined intent'. These figures are based on the new coding rules (see Suicide Statistics technical paper). National Records of Scotland (NRS) estimate that under the old coding rules, the total would have been 802 suicides (572 males and 230 females) for 2020, and 819 (608 males, 211 females) for 2019.

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2 hours ago, FTOF said:

Scottish trends - ScotPHO

Suicide: Scottish trends

In 2020, 805 suicides were registered in Scotland (575 males and 230 females), compared to 833 (620 males and 213 females) in 2019. These numbers comprise deaths coded to 'intentional self-harm' and to 'events of undetermined intent'. These figures are based on the new coding rules (see Suicide Statistics technical paper). National Records of Scotland (NRS) estimate that under the old coding rules, the total would have been 802 suicides (572 males and 230 females) for 2020, and 819 (608 males, 211 females) for 2019.

Despite some trying to blame Covid for everything certainly net resulting in an increase in suicide's. 

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Dilemma.

Life goes on. It has to.

I'm double vaxed. So are most people I know.

But I have friends who are double vaxed, caught COVID, and ended up in hospital very unwell.

I'm playing it safe. Watching my distancing and hygiene. LFD testing twice weekly.

But I can only control my own actions. Not those of people I come in contact with.

One single track and trace ping and my work has to shut down pending PCR test results.

After 15 months unable to work, you can bet your bottom dollar that protecting my work environment, colleagues and people I support is my priority.

Gigs? OMG I miss live music SO much. It was and is a major part of my life

I've been to one gig. I was happy with the steps the venue had taken.

I have a gig in October. Again, I am happy with the arrangements.

I asked for a refund for one gig. An artist I adore and am desperate to see. Sold out. Small venue. No distancing. Not worth the risk!

I have artists I absolutely love performing soon. Artists I want to support.

BUT... Unless I have complete confidence in the venue arrangements... And I don't give a stuff about passports which mean nothing and are worthless, I will err on the side of caution and will not attend.

I owe that to my employers who supported me 100% for 15 months of lockdown.

I owe that to my team and the people I support.

One track and trace ping ...
Such a fine line!

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1 hour ago, BuddieinEK said:

Dilemma.

Life goes on. It has to.

I'm double vaxed. So are most people I know.

But I have friends who are double vaxed, caught COVID, and ended up in hospital very unwell.

I'm playing it safe. Watching my distancing and hygiene. LFD testing twice weekly.

But I can only control my own actions. Not those of people I come in contact with.

One single track and trace ping and my work has to shut down pending PCR test results.

After 15 months unable to work, you can bet your bottom dollar that protecting my work environment, colleagues and people I support is my priority.

Gigs? OMG I miss live music SO much. It was and is a major part of my life

I've been to one gig. I was happy with the steps the venue had taken.

I have a gig in October. Again, I am happy with the arrangements.

I asked for a refund for one gig. An artist I adore and am desperate to see. Sold out. Small venue. No distancing. Not worth the risk!

I have artists I absolutely love performing soon. Artists I want to support.

BUT... Unless I have complete confidence in the venue arrangements... And I don't give a stuff about passports which mean nothing and are worthless, I will err on the side of caution and will not attend.

I owe that to my employers who supported me 100% for 15 months of lockdown.

I owe that to my team and the people I support.

One track and trace ping ...
Such a fine line!

It sounds like you'll be living in fear forever.

Enjoy, I'm LIVING life and taking risks every day, that's life. 

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On 8/28/2021 at 2:00 PM, BuddieinEK said:

I'll add racism to your list of failings!

"In the 1860s, "snowflake" was used by abolitionists in Missouri to refer to those who opposed the abolition of slavery. The term referred to the colour of snow, referring to valuing white people over black people."

 

10 minutes ago, BuddieinEK said:
49 minutes ago, faraway saint said:
Drama Queen. emoji38.png

Queen

You stupidly accuse bazil of racism yet are quite happy throwing around homophobic insults?

Oh dear. :byebye

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Is no one else getting worried that the vaccines don't seem to be stopping transmission? UK and Israel up there with the most vaccinated places on earth, but cases increasing rather than dropping - English schools going back won't help matters. 

Fingers crossed for a drop in cases before winter hits.

Also the drop off in antibodies for those vaccinated. The prediction earlier in the thread of boosters every 6 months isn't looking too far off. 

Interesting study done in Israel regarding natural immunity is worth a look

Comparing SARS-CoV-2 natural immunity to vaccine-induced immunity: reinfections versus breakthrough infections | medRxiv 

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