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faraway saint
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21 hours ago, faraway saint said:

A few days ago the "inflated" number, due to a delay in reporting, was 5,000 cases, in Scotland, in the one day.

This figure was all over the media.

Well, two can play that game, compared to that figure, todays figure, 3,756, has shown a drop of 25%.

Can't wait for tomorrows continued absolute abuse of power from wee Nicky. 

so the delayed figure represents more than one day's cases, maybe more than 2

and the next single day comes in substantially above 50% of the previous period.  This absolutely shows a marked increase.  

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4 minutes ago, beyond our ken said:

so the delayed figure represents more than one day's cases, maybe more than 2

and the next single day comes in substantially above 50% of the previous period. 

This absolutely shows a marked increase.  

Eh? 

Who said there was no increase? 

I'm not disputing the numbers, I'm pointing out, as if it needs pointing out of you had any sense, that the manipulation of the figures is scandalous. :byebye

Also, as I stated earlier, hospitals treat patients, not the number of cases. 

image.thumb.png.bfaaa7cdc68103fcad6780fcaddb973c.png

 

 

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Stolen from Facebook....................sums it up for a lot of people.

Reduce contact with people you know and have a better chance they are negative, yet mix with thousands you have no idea if they are vaccinated etc? :blink:

Is this getting more and more confusing 🤔 so work from home if you can, limit the number of people you have contact with but concerts, football games etc can still go ahead as long as you have had your booster.

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Stolen from Facebook....................sums it up for a lot of people.
Reduce contact with people you know and have a better chance they are negative, yet mix with thousands you have no idea if they are vaccinated etc? :blink:
Is this getting more and more confusing 1f914.png so work from home if you can, limit the number of people you have contact with but concerts, football games etc can still go ahead as long as you have had your booster.
I thought we weren't allowed to goto football. Hawd the bus that was waldorf not me imagining things this time.
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1 minute ago, Cookie Monster said:
3 minutes ago, faraway saint said:
Stolen from Facebook....................sums it up for a lot of people.
Reduce contact with people you know and have a better chance they are negative, yet mix with thousands you have no idea if they are vaccinated etc? :blink:
Is this getting more and more confusing 1f914.png so work from home if you can, limit the number of people you have contact with but concerts, football games etc can still go ahead as long as you have had your booster.

I thought we weren't allowed to goto football. Hawd the bus that was waldorf not me imagining things this time.

Games cancelled anyway so you can't go. :lol:

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I feel I should clarify somethings here.

I'm not against rules/guidelines/laws that make a real difference and are necessary, I've complied throughout this mess, when many haven't.

There is NOTHING to back up the reaction from both the UK and Scottish governments reactions and inflammatory language.

Aye, I'm not a sheep or a rebel, just not willing to accept everything that the government say. 

 

 

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On 12/13/2021 at 1:45 PM, Doakes said:

Ignoring the fact that the leaky vaccines still allow transmission, Britain is now a heavily vaccinated country with a low death rate - by prioritising boosters for healthy people with well functioning immune systems over assisting developing nations with large numbers of unvaccinated people seems an odd way of going about things

If it was all about saving lives, they would be prioritising getting the NHS back to full capacity - waiting lists for cancer treatment, operations etc. are absolutely massive and need to be addressed as a matter of priority

Moving on to boosters 4, 5, 6, 7 at such a frantic rate is unnecessary and not what the public signed up for. What happened to getting back to normal once most of the population was vaccinated? 

 

Careful now, talking a bit too much sense there.

I think what we now realise is the vaccines are a bit shit. I'm double jabbed, but have no intention of getting a booster of something that doesn't work very well.

Of course, nobody wants to acknowledge that or people might panic even more.

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2 minutes ago, Hendo said:

Careful now, talking a bit too much sense there.

I think what we now realise is the vaccines are a bit shit. I'm double jabbed, but have no intention of getting a booster of something that doesn't work very well.

Of course, nobody wants to acknowledge that or people might panic even more.

You have some evidence of this or are you just another conspiracy nutter? 

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Careful now, talking a bit too much sense there.
I think what we now realise is the vaccines are a bit shit. I'm double jabbed, but have no intention of getting a booster of something that doesn't work very well.
Of course, nobody wants to acknowledge that or people might panic even more.
The booster will be a different vaccine to your first 2 jags (yes, it's a jag not a jab, you are Scottish after all) and so will protect you more. As already mentioned on here, the Pfizer is apparently better against this particular variant so if you've had, say, two AZ jags then going for a booster, which would probably be Pfizer, would be the safe bet.

But only if you can get back in time from Roswell.

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To be honest I got booster a couple of weeks ago and I think it was before what one was more effective. I was given the moderna, I guess that was the more available one here at the time. To me anyway I think it's as effective as the risks you are willing to take. If you are gallus with that(a phrase they don't know in West cumbria) then so be it. I just try not to put myself in bad situations and LFT twice a week. We still got a horrid lot of those throat as well as nose ones at home🤢

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The booster will be a different vaccine to your first 2 jags (yes, it's a jag not a jab, you are Scottish after all) and so will protect you more. As already mentioned on here, the Pfizer is apparently better against this particular variant so if you've had, say, two AZ jags then going for a booster, which would probably be Pfizer, would be the safe bet.

But only if you can get back in time from Roswell.

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The booster will be different if you had AZ for your 1st 2 jags and aren't allergic to Pfizer or Moderna.

I got Moderna for all 3, how special am I
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The booster will be different if you had AZ for your 1st 2 jags and aren't allergic to Pfizer or Moderna.

I got Moderna for all 3, how special am I
I heard that Trump had shares in Moderna and their vaccine was just doses of Dettol. :whistle

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2 hours ago, faraway saint said:

You have some evidence of this or are you just another conspiracy nutter? 

The evidence is the number of people still getting covid after being vaccinated. I believe in vaccinations, always get the flu jag, kids are fully immunised, but most other vaccines stop you from becoming ill. This one doesn't, hence its a bit shit.

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6 hours ago, Hendo said:

The evidence is the number of people still getting covid after being vaccinated. I believe in vaccinations, always get the flu jag, kids are fully immunised, but most other vaccines stop you from becoming ill. This one doesn't, hence its a bit shit.

"Getting" covid, in itself, isn't, despite the media's usual over reaction, a major issue for the vast majority.

It DOES "stop you from becoming ill".  :blink:

Isn't the main job of this vaccination to reduce the chance of serious illness and death and reduce the number of people requiring hospital treatment?

Also the booster does what it says on the tin, greatly reducing the effects of the virus.

Where do you think we'd be WITHOUT the "shit" vaccine/booster? 

 

Edited by faraway saint
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10 hours ago, Hendo said:

Careful now, talking a bit too much sense there.

I think what we now realise is the vaccines are a bit shit. I'm double jabbed, but have no intention of getting a booster of something that doesn't work very well.

Of course, nobody wants to acknowledge that or people might panic even more.

Not everything in life comes with absolute guarantees. The vaccines did a fantastic job against all pre-Omicron variants

Hardly a bit shit, just consider that your booster may well be the difference between mild and moderate to severe symptoms if you do get Omicron COVID.

I’ve had my booster several weeks ago and still expect to get sick at some point but have given myself a better chance of getting through it without lasting effects or spreading the illness further 

make your own choices but don’t denigrate vaccines that have done a fantastic job so for 

 

 

Edited by beyond our ken
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2 minutes ago, beyond our ken said:

The vaccines did a fantastic job against all pre-Omicron variants

Hardly a bit shit, just consider that your booster may well be the difference between mild and moderate to severe symptoms if you do get Omicron COVID.

I’ve had my booster several weeks ago and still expect to get sick at some point but have given myself a better chance of getting through it without lasting effects 

make your own choices but don’t denigrate vaccines that have done a fantastic job so for 

 

 

Currently vaccine rates are over 80%, however 65% of people in hospital with covid are double vaccinated. That means it is having some effect - if it wasn't that figure would be at the same level as the vaccination rate - but you can't say that it is doing a fantastic job when almost two thirds of people with serious illness have had the vaccine.

I get that this is scary for people to hear as the vaccine is all we have, but the facts are it's not been nearly as effective as they had hoped. 

They did rush it through which is perhaps the reason for that, but this is yet another false narrative, that the vaccine is more effective than it is. Compare its effectiveness for instance to the MMR, which has virtually eradicated these three diseases in children.

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1 hour ago, Hendo said:

Currently vaccine rates are over 80%, however 65% of people in hospital with covid are double vaccinated. That means it is having some effect - if it wasn't that figure would be at the same level as the vaccination rate - but you can't say that it is doing a fantastic job when almost two thirds of people with serious illness have had the vaccine.

I get that this is scary for people to hear as the vaccine is all we have, but the facts are it's not been nearly as effective as they had hoped. 

They did rush it through which is perhaps the reason for that, but this is yet another false narrative, that the vaccine is more effective than it is. Compare its effectiveness for instance to the MMR, which has virtually eradicated these three diseases in children.

Can we not? The vaccine rates are closer to 90%, when we look at the vulnerable categories (older ages, serious health conditions) they are higher still. The majority of people that have refused vaccines are younger people who are less at risk from serious illness naturally anyway. When we breakdown the hospitalisations and see that 35% of people (going on your stats here, I haven't separately fact checked) of people are unvaccinated, it's overwhelming evidence the vaccines is doing a "fantastic job"

Edited by bazil85
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2 hours ago, Hendo said:

Currently vaccine rates are over 80%, however 65% of people in hospital with covid are double vaccinated. That means it is having some effect - if it wasn't that figure would be at the same level as the vaccination rate - but you can't say that it is doing a fantastic job when almost two thirds of people with serious illness have had the vaccine.

I get that this is scary for people to hear as the vaccine is all we have, but the facts are it's not been nearly as effective as they had hoped. 

They did rush it through which is perhaps the reason for that, but this is yet another false narrative, that the vaccine is more effective than it is. Compare its effectiveness for instance to the MMR, which has virtually eradicated these three diseases in children.

That is something of a cursory sweep through vaccination history with a heavy pinch of opinion thrown in.  The MMR was around for decades as individual vaccines before being combined in one jab decades ago.  they didnt achieve their results in a matter of months.  Add to that these diseases, TB and others are on the increase in some places due to misinformation, disinformation, complacency and opinion affecting the thinking of parents.

as the centre for evidence based medicine explains

COVID vaccines are extremely effective, but none 100% so. This itself isn’t surprising – flu vaccines aren’t 100% effective either. Yet in the US alone flu vaccines are estimated to prevent millions of cases of illness, tens of thousands of hospitalisations and thousands of deaths every year. The COVID vaccines are doing the same in the UK right now – all one has to do is compare the curves from the winter wave with those from this summer.

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30 minutes ago, beyond our ken said:

That is something of a cursory sweep through vaccination history with a heavy pinch of opinion thrown in.  The MMR was around for decades as individual vaccines before being combined in one jab decades ago.  they didnt achieve their results in a matter of months.  Add to that these diseases, TB and others are on the increase in some places due to misinformation, disinformation, complacency and opinion affecting the thinking of parents.

as the centre for evidence based medicine explains

COVID vaccines are extremely effective, but none 100% so. This itself isn’t surprising – flu vaccines aren’t 100% effective either. Yet in the US alone flu vaccines are estimated to prevent millions of cases of illness, tens of thousands of hospitalisations and thousands of deaths every year. The COVID vaccines are doing the same in the UK right now – all one has to do is compare the curves from the winter wave with those from this summer.

COVID vaccines are not extremely effective - that's not a criticism, it is a new vaccine developed quickly, but what we now know is it doesn't stop transmission, reduces the risk of serious illness to a degree but doesn't stop you catching it, and protection reduces within a few months. That is not the definition of extremely effective. When the vaccine was developed, the talk was you needed 70% of the population vaccinated to achieve "herd immunity" where the disease would die out - we are way past that figure and still in this position  - whatever way you slice it, the vaccine has not been nearly as effective as hoped. 

I took a bad reaction from my second dose  - I also believe I had covid last year before testing was available  - and the reaction to the vaccine was every bit as bad as the illness. I have therefore decided, on balance, not to have the booster. This is my right, as it is your right to make the decision to have it. However, unfortunately we are now on the slippery slope to discriminating against those who make the "wrong" choice. Scary times.

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3 hours ago, Hendo said:

COVID vaccines are not extremely effective - that's not a criticism, it is a new vaccine developed quickly, but what we now know is it doesn't stop transmission, reduces the risk of serious illness to a degree but doesn't stop you catching it, and protection reduces within a few months. That is not the definition of extremely effective. When the vaccine was developed, the talk was you needed 70% of the population vaccinated to achieve "herd immunity" where the disease would die out - we are way past that figure and still in this position  - whatever way you slice it, the vaccine has not been nearly as effective as hoped. 

I took a bad reaction from my second dose  - I also believe I had covid last year before testing was available  - and the reaction to the vaccine was every bit as bad as the illness. I have therefore decided, on balance, not to have the booster. This is my right, as it is your right to make the decision to have it. However, unfortunately we are now on the slippery slope to discriminating against those who make the "wrong" choice. Scary times.

Would you consider it really on balance when you are using a sample of one (yourself) against the globally available stats now that show the risks from the virus are far worse than from the vaccine?

Having a bad reaction to the last vaccine doesn't mean you will again. Conversely, having mild symptoms of the virus before, doesn't mean it will be mild again if you catch it a second time. 

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The vaccines certainly work to an extent, but because they don't stop transmission of the virus, it's always going to be a tough sell to convince people that taking several more boosters to be classed as fully vaccinated is the right way to go.

An Israeli health minister recently stated that it's going to take 7 boosters, possibly more, for Israeli's to be considered fully vaccinated.

As I said earlier in the thread - MRNA vaccine technology is designed to allow boosters for the latest variant, but there is a counter theory that it could also encourage ADE (antibody dependent enhancement)

Are people willing to commit to a booster once every 6 months (possibly even less) to maintain their fully vaccinated status? Is it a matter of time before you have a bad reaction to one of them? Will we ever be considered fully vaccinated? These are the important questions

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