Jump to content

Coronavirus


faraway saint
 Share

Recommended Posts


17 hours ago, Doakes said:

Why would you not be cautious of a new biotechnology that’s been granted emergency use authorisation to be injected into every human on the planet?

Why would you not be concerned that you’ll need to “show your papers” to enter a venue? 

It concerns me how easily some of you are prepared to hand over your basic freedoms. If the vaccine is so great, why is there so much fear of the unvaccinated? 

It’s all got very dystopian.

do you listen to what is said by independent experts?  

delta variant is capable of infecting the vaccinated-the vaccine slows down and inhibits it's spread but doesn't stop it

young people who are currently not in a vaccination group will eventually get to the age of 18-so by all of us taking sensible precautions they can have some protection if they are potentially susceptible to serious illness but not yet old enough to be listed for a jab

"Showing your papers" so what else do you do to get your parcel from the collection point?

Freedoms are earned and the backdrop to that changes all the time-this virus is just another example of how humans cannot plan everything and need to adapt their behaviours in order to survive, which is one of the reasons we have become a dominant species

Edited by beyond our ken
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/23/2021 at 8:33 PM, Doakes said:

Why would you not be cautious of a new biotechnology that’s been granted emergency use authorisation to be injected into every human on the planet?

every kid born after WW2 should have had dim parents who’d refuse the new biotechnology so that we could all have been free to contract polio, mumps, measles, chickenpox… and we should have refused to travel round the world vpbecause we didn’t want jagged to prevent Yellow Fever, Typhoid and Rabies….


Why would you not be concerned that you’ll need to “show your papers” to enter a venue? 

I agree.  Let children visit brothels and drink in pubs… even if they are 9 years old but claim to be 45 yo. Let anyone drive a vehicle without qualifications or insurance…   I’m guessing that you already accept similar restrictions to the one that you’re bitching about, here?

It concerns me how easily some of you are prepared to hand over your basic freedoms. If the vaccine is so great, why is there so much fear of the unvaccinated? 
 

You are already trading your so-called basic freedoms so you can participate in civilised society.  So… No big deal.
The vaccine gives some protection but, so far, all vaccines have been frank about their limitations.  They  ARE great, they are amazing.  But not perfect yet.  As humans always do, we get better, improve things, flourish!

let the virus continue to spread freely and it will continue to mutate into something to which society does not yet have an answer.  And then you(as well as thousands more) WILL be truly f**ked.



It’s all got very dystopian.

Dystopia is  in the eye of the beholder.   
 

in my eyes, a vaccinated world has a remarkably sunny sheen to it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites



Why would you not be cautious of a new biotechnology that’s been granted emergency use authorisation to be injected into every human on the planet?

Why would you not be concerned that you’ll need to “show your papers” to enter a venue? 
It concerns me how easily some of you are prepared to hand over your basic freedoms. If the vaccine is so great, why is there so much fear of the unvaccinated? 

It’s all got very dystopian.


Others have covered most of it already but ...

It's not exactly "new", at least not in the way some are trying to suggest. It's not just an idea that someone came up with in response to this virus, it's something that has been getting worked on for decades.

It's not fear of the unvaccinated, it's concern for those who, for medical reasons, cannot get the vaccine and for others who could be severely affected by even mild symptoms.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whilst I’ve nothing else to do, how’s this for a genuine update?

I’m currently in hospital have been for 2 days due to Covid ( shortness of breath and sore chest )

Double vaccinated

Tested positive for Covid on 9th July

Was typically unwell blah blah ….

My ‘SATS’ on oxygen in blood have been low for about a fortnight but this week really low (84) apparently under 94 get medical attention etc..

Got switched to St James 4am today

In 2 days had 2 Covid tests , 2 MRSA swab tests , bloods , Xray , Ultrasound on heart , daily injections to stop blood clotting Enoxaparin , and on oxygen as well as usual ECG traces etc ….

FFS ! I don’t feel ill as such , just can’t move without shortness of breath and sore chest

If I didn’t get vaccinated, I wonder what the consequences would have been

Has anyone else on here contracted Covid after vaccinations ?

ETA: I would browse Saints online shop or try buy a season ticket but …..

The wifi is pish incidentally £9:80 a day !!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Scott-Leeds said:

Whilst I’ve nothing else to do, how’s this for a genuine update?

I’m currently in hospital have been for 2 days due to Covid ( shortness of breath and sore chest )

Double vaccinated

Tested positive for Covid on 9th July

Was typically unwell blah blah ….

My ‘SATS’ on oxygen in blood have been low for about a fortnight but this week really low (84) apparently under 94 get medical attention etc..

Got switched to St James 4am today

In 2 days had 2 Covid tests , 2 MRSA swab tests , bloods , Xray , Ultrasound on heart , daily injections to stop blood clotting Enoxaparin , and on oxygen as well as usual ECG traces etc ….

FFS ! I don’t feel ill as such , just can’t move without shortness of breath and sore chest

If I didn’t get vaccinated, I wonder what the consequences would have been

Has anyone else on here contracted Covid after vaccinations ?

ETA: I would browse Saints online shop or try buy a season ticket but …..

The wifi is pish incidentally £9:80 a day !!

Stop moaning. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whilst I’ve nothing else to do, how’s this for a genuine update?

I’m currently in hospital have been for 2 days due to Covid ( shortness of breath and sore chest )

Double vaccinated

Tested positive for Covid on 9th July

Was typically unwell blah blah ….

My ‘SATS’ on oxygen in blood have been low for about a fortnight but this week really low (84) apparently under 94 get medical attention etc..

Got switched to St James 4am today

In 2 days had 2 Covid tests , 2 MRSA swab tests , bloods , Xray , Ultrasound on heart , daily injections to stop blood clotting Enoxaparin , and on oxygen as well as usual ECG traces etc ….

FFS ! I don’t feel ill as such , just can’t move without shortness of breath and sore chest

If I didn’t get vaccinated, I wonder what the consequences would have been

Has anyone else on here contracted Covid after vaccinations ?

ETA: I would browse Saints online shop or try buy a season ticket but …..

The wifi is pish incidentally £9:80 a day !!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting view from an American doctor......................he only left out the term "fcukwits". 

Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.
Sun, 1 August 2021, 2:00 pm
 
 
A
 
A

“We can’t let COVID win.”

This was my colleague’s mantra when the pandemic started last year. And for the almost 18 months since, health care workers have rallied to the battlefields, even at times when we had no weapons to brandish.

We took care of the infected and the critically ill when no one else would. We reused N95 masks, carefully placing them in labeled brown paper bags in between shifts. We witnessed lonely deaths and held up iPads for families to say their heartbreaking goodbyes. We created elaborate backup schedules and neglected our personal lives. We stepped up during surges and when our colleagues fell ill. Camaraderie in the ICU had never been stronger because we recognized that this was a team effort and all of humanity was battling against a common enemy.

But as health care workers, we also were painfully aware of our own vulnerabilities. We can run out of ICU resources for our patients. We can run out of personal protective equipment for ourselves. We can be exposed on the job and get sick. And we can die — many of us did, more than 3,600 from COVID-19 in the first year.

- ADVERTISEMENT -

Many of us quarantined away from our families to protect the ones we love. We counted the risk factors of our children, our elderly parents, our spouses, and came up with our own formulas to decide whether to come home at the end of the shift or hole up in a hotel room. One of our ICU directors wrote and rewrote our COVID-19 clinical guidelines to keep up with the evolving literature and somehow she carved out the time to write her own will.

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)
 
The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)

I worked daily to adapt our end-of-life program to the changing needs and restrictions of the pandemic and signed up for a vaccine clinical trial as soon as one became available. I also updated my own advance directive and printed it out for my husband, just in case.

Then, effective vaccines became widely available in the U.S. — I briefly saw light at the end of the tunnel. The number of patients with COVID-19 in ICUs across the country plummeted. It looked like our sacrifices and commitment as health care workers had paid off. We believed herd immunity could become a reality and we could return to some sense of normalcy.

But the relief was short-lived, the hope was fleeting, and we are amid another surge. A surge that is fueled by a highly transmissible variant and those unvaccinated. My experiences in the ICU these past weeks have left me surprised, disheartened, but most of all, angry.

I am angry that the tragic scenes of prior surges are being played out yet again, but now with ICUs primarily filled with patients who have chosen not to be vaccinated. I am angry that it takes me over an hour to explain to an anti-vaxxer full of misinformation that intubation isn’t what “kills patients” and that their wish for chest compressions without intubation in the event of a respiratory arrest makes no sense. I am angry at those who refuse to wear “muzzles” when grocery shopping for half an hour a week, as I have been so-called “muzzled” for much of the past 18 months.

I cannot understand the simultaneous decision to not get vaccinated and the demand to end the restrictions imposed by a pandemic. I cannot help but recoil as if I’ve been slapped in the face when my ICU patient tells me they didn’t get vaccinated because they “just didn’t get around to it.” Although such individuals do not consider themselves anti-vaxxers, their inaction itself is a decision — a decision to not protect themselves or their families, to fill a precious ICU bed, to let new variants flourish, and to endanger the health care workers and immunosuppressed people around them. Their inaction is a decision to let this pandemic continue to rage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, faraway saint said:

Interesting view from an American doctor......................he only left out the term "fcukwits". 

Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.
Sun, 1 August 2021, 2:00 pm
 
 
A
 
A

“We can’t let COVID win.”

This was my colleague’s mantra when the pandemic started last year. And for the almost 18 months since, health care workers have rallied to the battlefields, even at times when we had no weapons to brandish.

We took care of the infected and the critically ill when no one else would. We reused N95 masks, carefully placing them in labeled brown paper bags in between shifts. We witnessed lonely deaths and held up iPads for families to say their heartbreaking goodbyes. We created elaborate backup schedules and neglected our personal lives. We stepped up during surges and when our colleagues fell ill. Camaraderie in the ICU had never been stronger because we recognized that this was a team effort and all of humanity was battling against a common enemy.

But as health care workers, we also were painfully aware of our own vulnerabilities. We can run out of ICU resources for our patients. We can run out of personal protective equipment for ourselves. We can be exposed on the job and get sick. And we can die — many of us did, more than 3,600 from COVID-19 in the first year.

- ADVERTISEMENT -

Many of us quarantined away from our families to protect the ones we love. We counted the risk factors of our children, our elderly parents, our spouses, and came up with our own formulas to decide whether to come home at the end of the shift or hole up in a hotel room. One of our ICU directors wrote and rewrote our COVID-19 clinical guidelines to keep up with the evolving literature and somehow she carved out the time to write her own will.

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)
 

The author receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. (Photo: Courtesy of Thanh Neville, M.D., M.S.H.S.)

I worked daily to adapt our end-of-life program to the changing needs and restrictions of the pandemic and signed up for a vaccine clinical trial as soon as one became available. I also updated my own advance directive and printed it out for my husband, just in case.

Then, effective vaccines became widely available in the U.S. — I briefly saw light at the end of the tunnel. The number of patients with COVID-19 in ICUs across the country plummeted. It looked like our sacrifices and commitment as health care workers had paid off. We believed herd immunity could become a reality and we could return to some sense of normalcy.

But the relief was short-lived, the hope was fleeting, and we are amid another surge. A surge that is fueled by a highly transmissible variant and those unvaccinated. My experiences in the ICU these past weeks have left me surprised, disheartened, but most of all, angry.

I am angry that the tragic scenes of prior surges are being played out yet again, but now with ICUs primarily filled with patients who have chosen not to be vaccinated. I am angry that it takes me over an hour to explain to an anti-vaxxer full of misinformation that intubation isn’t what “kills patients” and that their wish for chest compressions without intubation in the event of a respiratory arrest makes no sense. I am angry at those who refuse to wear “muzzles” when grocery shopping for half an hour a week, as I have been so-called “muzzled” for much of the past 18 months.

I cannot understand the simultaneous decision to not get vaccinated and the demand to end the restrictions imposed by a pandemic. I cannot help but recoil as if I’ve been slapped in the face when my ICU patient tells me they didn’t get vaccinated because they “just didn’t get around to it.” Although such individuals do not consider themselves anti-vaxxers, their inaction itself is a decision — a decision to not protect themselves or their families, to fill a precious ICU bed, to let new variants flourish, and to endanger the health care workers and immunosuppressed people around them. Their inaction is a decision to let this pandemic continue to rage.

Aye, that's pretty much what I said. 🤣

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Slarti said:

Aye, that's pretty much what I said. 🤣

That's pretty much what people with half or more of a functioning brain have been saying for months, now. Which begs the obvious question...that's your cue again, faraway. 

🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh deary deary me.

Masks and Nightclubs

So as long as you have a pint in your hand you will not be needing to wear a face mask in either pubs or nightclubs but it's too dangerous to go without one when picking up a pint of milk at Tesco. All this is according to a government spokesman as seen in that tweet. :lol:

I feel sorry for anyone (including some professional scientists) who genuinely believed masking was all about the science. You are going to feel a bit f**king daft after today, if you have any sort of self awareness or humility whatsoever.

Is anyone really going to mask up for milk knowing people can freely abandon those masks in virtually every other setting?

You have to admit. It's pretty hilarious how much of a knot Sturgeon has tied herself up in because of her undying obsession with appearing to care more than Boris.

A bit of advice Nicola. Go to the press tomorrow morning and announce that masking is highly recommended but no longer legally required. And never, EVER darken our doorsteps again with this nonsense ya big dafty. :lol:

Edited by oaksoft
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/14/2021 at 6:58 PM, faraway saint said:

It seems you are the angel of death as, overall, suicides are not showing any increases during the pandemic.

As of June 2021, official statistics on suicide rates during the pandemic have not been released. This is because it takes a long time to register, analyse and report on suicide data at a national level, and this has been further delayed due to the pandemic.

Fortunately, provisional suicide rates for 2020 in England has found no evidence that national suicide rates increased. And evidence from the National Confidential Inquiry (NCISH) and the University of Manchester suggests suicide rates during the first national lockdown in England have not been impacted in the way that many of us were concerned about. Real-time data from other nations in the UK and Ireland is not available as surveillance systems are not currently widespread, though some are under development.

Scottish trends - ScotPHO

Suicide: Scottish trends

In 2020, 805 suicides were registered in Scotland (575 males and 230 females), compared to 833 (620 males and 213 females) in 2019. These numbers comprise deaths coded to 'intentional self-harm' and to 'events of undetermined intent'. These figures are based on the new coding rules (see Suicide Statistics technical paper). National Records of Scotland (NRS) estimate that under the old coding rules, the total would have been 802 suicides (572 males and 230 females) for 2020, and 819 (608 males, 211 females) for 2019.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, FTOF said:

Scottish trends - ScotPHO

Suicide: Scottish trends

In 2020, 805 suicides were registered in Scotland (575 males and 230 females), compared to 833 (620 males and 213 females) in 2019. These numbers comprise deaths coded to 'intentional self-harm' and to 'events of undetermined intent'. These figures are based on the new coding rules (see Suicide Statistics technical paper). National Records of Scotland (NRS) estimate that under the old coding rules, the total would have been 802 suicides (572 males and 230 females) for 2020, and 819 (608 males, 211 females) for 2019.

Despite some trying to blame Covid for everything certainly net resulting in an increase in suicide's. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...