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Scotland's Football Jukebox


ICC
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19 minutes ago, ICC said:

The first one I ever heard.

Loved it.

 

This record broke my heart. Reason?

My 7 inch single was sitting up against the record player (mind those record players where you could stack about half a dozen singles at a time but the sound got more wonky the more they dropped). Anyway, my big sister “accidentally” stood on it and snapped in two.

Ring a ding a ding, no more Willie on the wing 😩

Never forgave her for that. 

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5 hours ago, TPAFKA Jersey 2 said:

This record broke my heart. Reason?

My 7 inch single was sitting up against the record player (mind those record players where you could stack about half a dozen singles at a time but the sound got more wonky the more they dropped). Anyway, my big sister “accidentally” stood on it and snapped in two.

Ring a ding a ding, no more Willie on the wing 😩

Never forgave her for that. 

Always wondered why you ended up in Jersey…did you murder her? You’ve been on the run all this time.

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5 hours ago, Cookie Monster said:

Serpents emoji848.png

“A lion rampant (standing erect with forepaws raised) was a lion, while a lion walking with head turned full-face (passant guardant) – as in the English royal arms – was a leopard. It’s important to note that ‘leopard’ was a technical heraldic distinction; there were no spotted felines on any coat-of-arms in the Middle Ages.

Like all heraldic animals, the leopard carried some symbolic meaning; it was thought to be the result of an adulterous union between a lion and a mythical beast called a ‘pard’ (hence leo-pard). Believed to be incapable of reproducing, leopards were sometimes (but not always) used for someone born of adultery, or unable to have children – a senior clergyman for example.”

So basically what this is saying is the English are mainly bastards.

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“A lion rampant (standing erect with forepaws raised) was a lion, while a lion walking with head turned full-face (passant guardant) – as in the English royal arms – was a leopard. It’s important to note that ‘leopard’ was a technical heraldic distinction; there were no spotted felines on any coat-of-arms in the Middle Ages.
Like all heraldic animals, the leopard carried some symbolic meaning; it was thought to be the result of an adulterous union between a lion and a mythical beast called a ‘pard’ (hence leo-pard). Believed to be incapable of reproducing, leopards were sometimes (but not always) used for someone born of adultery, or unable to have children – a senior clergyman for example.”
So basically what this is saying is the English are mainly bastards.
Yeah, that's it. Don't know why I thought of serpant ya snake.
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