Jump to content

Windows 7


saintargyll
 Share

Recommended Posts


is it worth getting?

Maybe. I've heard it said it's really no more than a service pack for Vista.

is it available on a download on the internet?

Probably - check Microsoft's website.

is it free?

You having a giraffe?

anyone got it??

Nope, and I wouldn't bother if I were you. Wait about 9 months or so until all the shitty, disruptive, and brain-dead stupid faults have been discovered and rectified. Like Vista, definitely not worth taking up on first release. Vista is till shite even after umpteen service packs, mind, so maybe you'd be better off trying an open source operating system, such as Ubuntu - Virus free and updated by sandal-wearing geek freaks every day - and absolutely free into the bargain.

Edited by Crispian Crunchie
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are unfortunate enough to be running Windows Vista then the upgrade to Windows 7 is worthwhile. It's much quicker, much more stable and much less annoying than Vista, but it retains the pretty look and feel of that OS.

Windows XP is an absolutely superb operating system, and if you're happy with it then there is probably no need to rush to upgrade.

From Vista you can do an "in-place" upgrade, where you just chuck the Windows 7 media in the computer and let it do it's thing, but there is no direct upgrade path from XP to Windows 7. You'd have to backup all your data, do a clean Win 7 install and then restore your files. There are Microsoft tools to help with all of that and of course you can buy an upgrade version of Win 7 which will reduce the cost.

Windows 7 is not free, and is not available for download (legally), you have to buy the media either online or from a software retailer.

I'm running Windows 7 and I'm really pleased with it, but I am a bit of a geek :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope, and I wouldn't bother if I were you. Wait about 9 months or so until all the shitty, disruptive, and brain-dead stupid faults have been discovered and rectified. Like Vista, definitely not worth taking up on first release. Vista is till shite even after umpteen service packs, mind, so maybe you'd be better off trying an open source operating system, such as Ubuntu - Virus free and updated by sandal-wearing geek freaks every day - and absolutely free into the bargain.

There's only been two service packs for Vista :P

Ubuntu is a great Operating System if all you want to do is surf the web and read email. If you want to run the majority of applications through you need a Windows environment. You can't run iTunes on Ubuntu for a kick off, and there are umpteen other things that just won't run on it or won't run on it without the user having a degree in computer science.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ubuntu readies the Karmic Koala

What do French gendarmes, Andalucian school children, Wikipedia and San Francisco International airport have in common?

It is not the set up for a tortuous pun. Instead all of them are big users of the free Ubuntu operating system.

The French national police force runs its operations on the open source OS; computer systems supporting Spanish schools have their own version; the online encyclopaedia runs its hundreds of servers on Ubuntu and SFIA's internal computer system is based around it.

Ubuntu is based on Linux - the open source operating system that is maintained, expanded and extended by legions of fans and professional programmers around the world. Thanks to their efforts Ubuntu has become the most popular of all the Linux distributions.

On 29 October, version 9.10 of Ubuntu is released. All versions of the operating system have an alternative alliterative appellation. Ubuntu 9.10 is known as Karmic Koala.

The launch comes in the wake of Microsoft's fanfare around Windows 7 - the latest incarnation of its flagship operating system.

Factory mode

While Ubuntu's developer Canonical can not quite match the hoopla surrounding Windows 7 for its launch, the software competes where it matters, said Chris Kenyon, one of Canonical's OS evangelists.

"For the first time in 20 years you can buy Ubuntu pre-installed from more than one manufacturer," he said. "That's an extraordinary story."

Faced with such consumer inertia it's hard to see Linux making much progress in boosting its miniscule market share

Rory Cellan-Jones

Technology correspondent

Read Rory's thoughts in full

Computer makes HP, Dell, Toshiba and Acer now all offer the OS as a choice on machines people buy via their websites. The number of models varies by territory with the software proving more popular in some places than others.

Dell China, said Mr Kenyon, has more than 40 models with Ubuntu available.

Before now, he said, many people installed the software themselves on laptops and desktops that formerly ran Windows. Their experiences varied because the development effort that helps to keep Ubuntu updated sometimes lags behind what people are using.

But, he said, with the software increasingly likely to be installed at the factory those days of frustration may be on the wane.

"Hardware problems are only really solved through installation," he said. "That's going to become increasingly the case over the next 12 months."

Competition time

The steady march of technology was also removing many of those stumbling blocks that stopped people plumping for Ubuntu and kept them with Windows or Apple's OS X, said Mr Kenyon.

Microsoft now lists Canonical under threats in its regular stock filing

Some have been reluctant to move to Ubuntu and open source software because it would mean learning their way around programs that were the equivalent of what they used on older machines.

But, said Mr Kenyon, the growing use of web applications - such as Google Docs - was eroding those differences quickly.

"The web is making the compatibility part far easier," he said.

To help with that ease of use Ubuntu 9.10 has Firefox 3.5 onboard that works with the many web-based programs, such as the BBC iPlayer, that are becoming increasingly popular.

With the web levelling the playing field between the different OS makers, Mr Kenyon said the fact that Ubuntu runs faster and is more secure than rivals on the same hardware will convince many to try it.

He admitted that some of the security of Ubuntu was down to the fact that cyber criminals do not target it in the same way as they do Windows.

"Some of the security is through obscurity but it's also better by design," he said. "Fundamentally it requires you to run a safer system. It's there from the ground up."

Canonical is also making it easier to road test Ubuntu with a "live mode" that lets potential users run it off a USB drive to check its compatibility with the hardware on their desktop or laptop.

Evidence that it is being taken seriously can be found, he said, in the annual "10-K form" that Microsoft files with the SEC. Every public firm must file one of these to outline the market conditions and competitors it believes pose the greatest threat to its business.

In 2009, for the first time, Canonical got a mention.

Given that Microsoft recognises its success, Mr Kenyon is convinced that it's only a matter of time before Ubuntu's 12 million strong pool of users is joined by many more.

"We're nearing a tipping point," said Mr Kenyon.

Div,does this make any difference?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Div,does this make any difference?

Not really !

You need to think about what you use your computer for. If it's purely browsing the internet, reading email, and doing the odd word document or spreadsheet then Ubuntu is great.

I'd still say the average punter would be better off with Windows 7, it is a huge improvement on Vista in terms of speed and stability, and whilst Microsoft are always being attacked, they are MUCH better at dealing with security and threats than they ever have been in the past.

You could always try Ubuntu, it is free after all, but I guarantee you that at some point you'll want to do something and you won't be able to because it isn't supporterd on Linux !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not really !

You need to think about what you use your computer for. If it's purely browsing the internet, reading email, and doing the odd word document or spreadsheet then Ubuntu is great.

I'd still say the average punter would be better off with Windows 7, it is a huge improvement on Vista in terms of speed and stability, and whilst Microsoft are always being attacked, they are MUCH better at dealing with security and threats than they ever have been in the past.

You could always try Ubuntu, it is free after all, but I guarantee you that at some point you'll want to do something and you won't be able to because it isn't supporterd on Linux !

Cheers!

now get to the game :cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...